break-in

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break-in

(brāk′ĭn′)
n.
1. A forcible entry, as into a building or room, for an illegal purpose, especially theft.
2. An initial period of employment or operation during which the performance of a person or thing may be evaluated and adjusted.

break′-in`



n.
1. an illegal forcible entry into a home, office, etc.
2. a period of using or running something new, as an automobile, until normal operating conditions have been reached.
[1855–60]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.break-in - trespassing for an unlawful purposebreak-in - trespassing for an unlawful purpose; illegal entrance into premises with criminal intent
burglary - entering a building unlawfully with intent to commit a felony or to steal valuable property
home invasion - burglary of a dwelling while the residents are at home

break-in

noun burglary, robbery, breaking and entering The break-in had occurred just before midnight.

break-in

noun
The act of entering a building or room with the intent to commit theft:
Translations

break-in

[ˈbreɪkˌɪn] Nrobo m (con allanamiento de morada)

break-in

nEinbruch m; we’ve had a break-inbei uns ist eingebrochen worden

break-in

[ˈbreɪkˌɪn] nirruzione f

break

(breik) past tense broke (brouk) : past participle brəken (ˈbroukən) verb
1. to divide into two or more parts (by force).
2. (usually with off/away) to separate (a part) from the whole (by force).
3. to make or become unusable.
4. to go against, or not act according to (the law etc). He broke his appointment at the last minute.
5. to do better than (a sporting etc record).
6. to interrupt. She broke her journey in London.
7. to put an end to. He broke the silence.
8. to make or become known. They gently broke the news of his death to his wife.
9. (of a boy's voice) to fall in pitch.
10. to soften the effect of (a fall, the force of the wind etc).
11. to begin. The storm broke before they reached shelter.
noun
1. a pause. a break in the conversation.
2. a change. a break in the weather.
3. an opening.
4. a chance or piece of (good or bad) luck. This is your big break.
ˈbreakable adjective
(negative unbreakable) likely to break. breakable toys.
noun
(usually in plural) something likely to break.
ˈbreakage (-kidʒ) noun
the act of breaking, or its result(s).
ˈbreaker noun
a (large) wave which breaks on rocks or the beach.
ˈbreakdown noun
1. (often nervous breakdown) a mental collapse.
2. a mechanical failure causing a stop. The car has had another breakdown. See also break down.
break-inbreak in(to)ˈbreakneck adjective
(usually of speed) dangerous. He drove at breakneck speed.
breakoutbreak outˈbreakthrough noun
a sudden solution of a problem leading to further advances, especially in science.
ˈbreakwater noun
a barrier to break the force of the waves.
break away
to escape from control. The dog broke away from its owner.
break down
1. to use force on (a door etc) to cause it to open.
2. to stop working properly. My car has broken down.
3. to fail. The talks have broken down.
4. to be overcome with emotion. She broke down and wept.
break in(to)
1. to enter (a house etc) by force or unexpectedly (noun ˈbreak-in. The Smiths have had two break-ins recently).
2. to interrupt (someone's conversation etc).
break loose
to escape from control. The dog has broken loose.
break off
to stop. She broke off in the middle of a sentence.
break out
1. to appear or happen suddenly. War has broken out.
2. to escape (from prison, restrictions etc). A prisoner has broken out (noun ˈbreakout).
break out in
to (suddenly) become covered in a rash, in sweat etc. I'm allergic to strawberries. They make me break out in a rash.
break the ice
to overcome the first shyness etc. Let's break the ice by inviting our new neighbours for a meal.
break up
1. to divide, separate or break into pieces. He broke up the old furniture and burnt it; John and Mary broke up (= separated from each other) last week.
2. to finish or end. The meeting broke up at 4.40.
make a break for it
to make an (attempt to) escape. When the guard is not looking, make a break for it.

break-in

اقْتِحام vloupání indbrud Einbruch διάρρηξη robo con allanamiento de morada murto cambriolage provala irruzione 押し入ること 침입 inbraak innbrudd włamanie arrombamento вторгаться inbrott การบุกรุกเข้าไป hırsızlık sự đột nhập 闯入
References in periodicals archive ?
Director John Dixon, who shared the CCTV footage online, said: "The break-ins have had an immediate and massive impact on our clients.
Over the weekend there were 12 break-ins across Middlesbrough - the majority were at unlocked or insecure homes.
RAIDERS are climbing scaffolding to launch a wave of break-ins and trash families' homes.
VILLAGERS using a popular village sports complex have been left exasperated by a series of break-ins.
INNER-CITY residents were today urged to get back to basics over their home security after a "significant" spate of break-ins.
Piute has been hit tremendously hard with vandalism and break-ins over the last six months.
Detectives said Smith had been active for 24 years and break-ins at Southampton plummeted when the eight were arrested.
Students at the University of Birmingham reported only 13 break-ins at their flats and bedsits in the Boumbrook and Selly Oak area over the Christmas and New Year holidays.
Gordon Liddy and others, seeks damages for the book's conclusion that John Dean ordered the Watergate break-ins and engineered the subsequent coverup which led to the downfall of President Richard Nixon.
Sharjah Police on Monday arrested a 27-year-old Emirati for his involvement in a number of car break-ins and theft of valuable items.
THE police in Paphos is discussing solutions to clamp down on the rising number of thefts and break-ins in Peyia.