breakeven


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Related to breakeven: Break even analysis

break·e·ven

or break-e·ven  (brāk′ē′vən)
adj.
Marked by or indicating a balance, especially between investment and return.
n.
1. The point, especially the level of sales of a good or service, at which the return on investment is exactly equal to the amount invested.
2. The point at which the energy produced by a system is equal to that put into it, thereby rendering the system self-sustaining. In both senses also called break-even point.
References in periodicals archive ?
To answer the question of viability for production use, Mueller AMS and 3D Systems conducted a test using real molded pattern data, plus printed pattern estimates and model cost and time per pattern to determine breakeven quantities.
It is also based on the asset percentage (AP) used in the asset coverage test (ACT) that Fitch relies on in its analysis (90.5%), which provides more protection than Fitch's 'AAA' breakeven AP of 92.0%.
Says signed a definitive agreement to acquire 12 retail locations in Louisiana, expects to add $15M in annualized sales, breakeven to EPS in 2019.
The fiscal breakeven price of oil in Qatar amounted to $47.1 per barrel in 2018 against $24.2 in 2008, Kamco said.
Spot rates for very large crude carriers (VLCCs), with a capacity to transport 260,000 tones of oil, have recently dropped to a loss-making $13,000-14,000 per day, far below Frontline's cash breakeven rate of $21,600.
In retail operations, the cost of goods sold (COGS) is one traditional way to estimate the breakeven point.
Summary: According to IMF, fiscal oil breakeven is an important metric, but it fluctuates based on governments' expenditure and oil production
The current period of weakness has plunged price levels below most countries' fiscal breakeven prices, the level needed to generate a fiscal surplus.
Many of these countries have also accumulated sizeable financial reserves, it said, indicating that the only country in the MENA that can still generate a fiscal surplus with current oil prices is Kuwait, which posts a breakeven price of USD 50 for 2015, as estimated by the International Monetary Fund (IMF).
"The only country in MENA that can still generate a fiscal surplus with current oil prices is Kuwait, which posts a breakeven price of $50 for 2015, as estimated by the International Monetary Fund (IMF).
About a quarter of new wells in 2014 had a breakeven WTI price of $40 or less.
Dubai: Average oil prices have been well above the breakeven prices of oil for the GCC.