breakout

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break·out

 (brāk′out′)
n.
1. A forceful emergence from a restrictive condition or situation.
2. A sudden manifestation or increase, as of a disease; an outbreak.
3. A sudden or dramatic improvement or increase in popularity: "Now grown on a small scale in several arid regions, this crop seems poised for a major breakout" (Noel Vietmeyer).
4. A breakdown of statistical data.
5. Sports A play, as in hockey, in which the defending team moves the puck out of its defensive zone, especially by passing, to begin an offensive play.
adj.
1. Characterized by a sudden significant improvement or increase in popularity: a ballplayer having a breakout season; a band with a breakout album.
2. Conducted separately from a larger group or meeting: attended several breakout sessions at the conference.

break•out

(ˈbreɪkˌaʊt)

n.
1. an escape, often by force, as from a prison.
2. a sudden, often widespread appearance or occurrence, as of a disease; outbreak.
3. an itemization; breakdown.
[1810–20]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.breakout - an escape from jailbreakout - an escape from jail; "the breakout was carefully planned"
escape, flight - the act of escaping physically; "he made his escape from the mental hospital"; "the canary escaped from its cage"; "his flight was an indication of his guilt"

breakout

noun
The act or an instance of escaping, as from confinement or difficulty:
Slang: lam.
Translations
pako

breakout

break-out [ˈbreɪkaʊt] n (= escape) → évasion fbreak point n (tennis)balle f de break

break

(breik) past tense broke (brouk) : past participle brəken (ˈbroukən) verb
1. to divide into two or more parts (by force).
2. (usually with off/away) to separate (a part) from the whole (by force).
3. to make or become unusable.
4. to go against, or not act according to (the law etc). He broke his appointment at the last minute.
5. to do better than (a sporting etc record).
6. to interrupt. She broke her journey in London.
7. to put an end to. He broke the silence.
8. to make or become known. They gently broke the news of his death to his wife.
9. (of a boy's voice) to fall in pitch.
10. to soften the effect of (a fall, the force of the wind etc).
11. to begin. The storm broke before they reached shelter.
noun
1. a pause. a break in the conversation.
2. a change. a break in the weather.
3. an opening.
4. a chance or piece of (good or bad) luck. This is your big break.
ˈbreakable adjective
(negative unbreakable) likely to break. breakable toys.
noun
(usually in plural) something likely to break.
ˈbreakage (-kidʒ) noun
the act of breaking, or its result(s).
ˈbreaker noun
a (large) wave which breaks on rocks or the beach.
ˈbreakdown noun
1. (often nervous breakdown) a mental collapse.
2. a mechanical failure causing a stop. The car has had another breakdown. See also break down.
break-inbreak in(to)ˈbreakneck adjective
(usually of speed) dangerous. He drove at breakneck speed.
breakoutbreak outˈbreakthrough noun
a sudden solution of a problem leading to further advances, especially in science.
ˈbreakwater noun
a barrier to break the force of the waves.
break away
to escape from control. The dog broke away from its owner.
break down
1. to use force on (a door etc) to cause it to open.
2. to stop working properly. My car has broken down.
3. to fail. The talks have broken down.
4. to be overcome with emotion. She broke down and wept.
break in(to)
1. to enter (a house etc) by force or unexpectedly (noun ˈbreak-in. The Smiths have had two break-ins recently).
2. to interrupt (someone's conversation etc).
break loose
to escape from control. The dog has broken loose.
break off
to stop. She broke off in the middle of a sentence.
break out
1. to appear or happen suddenly. War has broken out.
2. to escape (from prison, restrictions etc). A prisoner has broken out (noun ˈbreakout).
break out in
to (suddenly) become covered in a rash, in sweat etc. I'm allergic to strawberries. They make me break out in a rash.
break the ice
to overcome the first shyness etc. Let's break the ice by inviting our new neighbours for a meal.
break up
1. to divide, separate or break into pieces. He broke up the old furniture and burnt it; John and Mary broke up (= separated from each other) last week.
2. to finish or end. The meeting broke up at 4.40.
make a break for it
to make an (attempt to) escape. When the guard is not looking, make a break for it.

breakout

n. erupción.
References in periodicals archive ?
Since then, that grade level has "really embraced the whole concept of how breakouts challenge their brains and make them problem solve.
Once I started doing breakouts, I have had many colleagues approach me to find them a game to match the topics they are studying and many who want to collaborate to make these together.
The coverage provides hard numbers on sizes of the various registries, the TNC breakouts of banked units, detailed cost breakouts for banking as well as HSCTs utilizing cord blood.
Summary: Forex trading conditions continue to point to breakouts in the US dollar and other major currencies, and we forecast that Breakout and Momentum trades.
Breakouts sponsored by: FMC Corporation and Mosaic Company
And when it's not pretty, the blotchy, zitty, bumpy breakouts often include not just the skin on your face, but it attacks your back and even your shoulders and chest.
Deputy Mayor Carmel Sella said the Mayor's Office could only provide regional breakouts to ``the extent practicable,'' and provided no timetable, turning the matter over to the CAO's office.
He says research amongst steel workers has revealed up to five breakouts, although much smaller in scale, on the No 5 blast furnace in the past five years.
Government data reflecting the incorporation of these new breakouts is expected to be available, for the first time, by the end of this month.
Picking, poking and squeezing force bacteria deeper into the skin, resulting in scarring and further breakouts.
It explains why breakouts form and why they end, which is always at some kind of support or resistance area.