breakthrough

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break·through

 (brāk′thro͞o′)
n.
1. An act of overcoming or penetrating an obstacle or restriction.
2. A military offensive that penetrates an enemy's lines of defense.
3. A major achievement or success that permits further progress, as in technology.

break•through

(ˈbreɪkˌθru)

n.
1. a significant or sudden advance, development, etc., as in scientific knowledge.
2. an act or instance of removing or surpassing an obstruction or restriction.
3. a military advance through and beyond an enemy's defense.
[1915–20]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.breakthrough - a productive insightbreakthrough - a productive insight      
brainstorm, brainwave, insight - the clear (and often sudden) understanding of a complex situation
2.breakthrough - making an important discovery
discovery, find, uncovering - the act of discovering something
3.breakthrough - a penetration of a barrier such as an enemy's defense
penetration, incursion - an attack that penetrates into enemy territory

breakthrough

noun development, advance, progress, improvement, discovery, find, finding, invention, step forward, leap forwards, turn of events, quantum leap The breakthrough came hours before a UN deadline.
Translations
اختراق، تطوّر فجائي في حل مشكله
průlomzásadní objev
fremskridtgennembrud
áttörés
tímamótaskref
náhly krok vpred
preboj
önemli buluş

breakthrough

[ˈbreɪkθruː] N (Mil) → avance m; (in research etc) → adelanto m muy importante
to achieve or make a breakthroughconseguir or hacer un adelanto muy importante

breakthrough

[ˈbreɪkθruː] n (= important achievement) → percée f
to make a breakthrough [scientist] → faire une découverte capitale; [company, entrepreneur] → faire une percée
The company looks poised to make a significant breakthrough in China → La compagnie semble prête à faire une percée significative sur le marché chinois.break-up [ˈbreɪkʌp] n [partnership] → rupture f; [marriage] → échec m; [group of states] → morcellement m; [empire] → démembrement m; [political party] → scission fbreak-up value nvaleur f de liquidation

breakthrough

[ˈbreɪkˌθruː] n (in research) → scoperta decisiva (Mil) → breccia

break

(breik) past tense broke (brouk) : past participle brəken (ˈbroukən) verb
1. to divide into two or more parts (by force).
2. (usually with off/away) to separate (a part) from the whole (by force).
3. to make or become unusable.
4. to go against, or not act according to (the law etc). He broke his appointment at the last minute.
5. to do better than (a sporting etc record).
6. to interrupt. She broke her journey in London.
7. to put an end to. He broke the silence.
8. to make or become known. They gently broke the news of his death to his wife.
9. (of a boy's voice) to fall in pitch.
10. to soften the effect of (a fall, the force of the wind etc).
11. to begin. The storm broke before they reached shelter.
noun
1. a pause. a break in the conversation.
2. a change. a break in the weather.
3. an opening.
4. a chance or piece of (good or bad) luck. This is your big break.
ˈbreakable adjective
(negative unbreakable) likely to break. breakable toys.
noun
(usually in plural) something likely to break.
ˈbreakage (-kidʒ) noun
the act of breaking, or its result(s).
ˈbreaker noun
a (large) wave which breaks on rocks or the beach.
ˈbreakdown noun
1. (often nervous breakdown) a mental collapse.
2. a mechanical failure causing a stop. The car has had another breakdown. See also break down.
break-inbreak in(to)ˈbreakneck adjective
(usually of speed) dangerous. He drove at breakneck speed.
breakoutbreak outˈbreakthrough noun
a sudden solution of a problem leading to further advances, especially in science.
ˈbreakwater noun
a barrier to break the force of the waves.
break away
to escape from control. The dog broke away from its owner.
break down
1. to use force on (a door etc) to cause it to open.
2. to stop working properly. My car has broken down.
3. to fail. The talks have broken down.
4. to be overcome with emotion. She broke down and wept.
break in(to)
1. to enter (a house etc) by force or unexpectedly (noun ˈbreak-in. The Smiths have had two break-ins recently).
2. to interrupt (someone's conversation etc).
break loose
to escape from control. The dog has broken loose.
break off
to stop. She broke off in the middle of a sentence.
break out
1. to appear or happen suddenly. War has broken out.
2. to escape (from prison, restrictions etc). A prisoner has broken out (noun ˈbreakout).
break out in
to (suddenly) become covered in a rash, in sweat etc. I'm allergic to strawberries. They make me break out in a rash.
break the ice
to overcome the first shyness etc. Let's break the ice by inviting our new neighbours for a meal.
break up
1. to divide, separate or break into pieces. He broke up the old furniture and burnt it; John and Mary broke up (= separated from each other) last week.
2. to finish or end. The meeting broke up at 4.40.
make a break for it
to make an (attempt to) escape. When the guard is not looking, make a break for it.

breakthrough

adj — pain dolor irruptivo, dolor que aparece a veces a pesar del medicamento tomado diariamente para controlarlo
References in periodicals archive ?
The goal of this prize is to inspire young people to explain big ideas in math and science in new and novel ways, possibly opening all of our minds to the mysteries of the universe and leading to the breakthroughs of the future
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They asked the program to focus on achieving breakthroughs that no single company could do on its own.
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This approach to R&D makes possible breakthroughs like strained silicon.
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com/research/t28p4w/technology) has announced the addition of the "Technology Breakthroughs Shaping the Future of Atmospheric Water Generation" report to their offering.
We tend to underestimate the value of rapid, incremental innovations, which actually begin to look like breakthroughs over time," he says.