breech-loader


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breech-loader

(ˈbriːtʃˌləʊdə)
n
(Firearms, Gunnery, Ordnance & Artillery) a firearm that is loaded at the breech
Translations

breech-loader

n (Mil) → Hinterlader m
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
For a moment, for just so long as it needs to stuff a cartridge into a breech-loader, the lama hesitated.
It is best described in Claude Fuller's extensive study, The Breech-Loader in the Service 1816-1917 where he says, "The barrel of the gun is cut off about 3 inches in front of the breech-pin and screwed into a new breech-receiver The breechblock consists of a solid piece of iron hinged to the front of the receiver, and moving in a horizontal plane.
The gun employed a unique cartridge (a variant of which would also be used in the Westley Richards "Monkey Tail" breech-loader) that involved--depending upon the bore of the weapon--a .539 or .568 hollow-based bullet encapsulated within a nitrated paper wrapper holding the appropriate powder charge and that, at its base, had an attached greased felt wad.
During the Crimean War, he read about the problems the British Army had with manoeuvring their heavy guns and developed a lighter one, the Armstrong breech-loader, which was also very accurate and far superior to the enemy's weapons.
With the start of the Crimean War, Armstrong turned his ingenuity to the improvement of artillery, developing an impressively accurate field gun, the Armstrong breech-loader. In 1859 he was knighted and, in effect, made gun-maker in chief to the British Army.
Civil War, the Secretary of War convened a Board of Officers "for the purpose of examining, testing, and recommending for adoption, a suitable breech-loader for muskets and carbines." The recommendation of that Board and a subsequent Board was the Peabody be adopted as a metallic cartridge firing replacement for the muzzleloading musket.
Beside him, with one chamber discharged, was a double-barrelled breech-loader, which the unfortunate gentleman had evidently placed in his mouth.
His assignment was "to devise a plan for altering the musket into a breech-loader for the metallic primed cartridge."
The fort was originally armed with nine 12.5in muzzle loading guns, replaced in 1884 with more modern 12in breech-loaders.
Guns must be single-shot breech-loaders with an exposed hammer and use a metallic cartridge of .38 caliber or larger.