breech-loading

breech-loading

(ˈbriːtʃˌləʊdɪŋ)
adj
(Firearms, Gunnery, Ordnance & Artillery) (of a firearm) loaded at the breech
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.breech-loading - (of guns) designed to be loaded at the breech
References in classic literature ?
On the forecastle lay the perfection of a breech-loading gun, very thick at the breech, and very narrow in the bore, the model of which had been in the Exhibition of 1867.
The latter, all the while swearing that he would not go, went on board with a regular arsenal of hunting weapons, among which were two double-barrelled breech-loading fowling-pieces, and a rifle that had withstood every test, of the make of Purdey, Moore & Dickson, at Edinburgh.
Three heavy breech-loading double-eight elephant guns, weighing about fifteen pounds each, to carry a charge of eleven drachms of black powder.
Then there are breech-loading rifles and those with magazines that I must hasten to study out and learn to reproduce as soon as we get settled down again; and--"
Martini-Henry rifles are breech-loading, single-shot, lever-actuated rifles that replaced the Snider-Enfield as British Army issue.
The muzzleloading and early breech-loading eras are good examples with their self-consuming paper and linen cartridges.
In 1848 Christian Sharp designed the first breech-loading system for rifles, making loading quicker and easier.
Comprised of four volumes separated into categories involving Federal muzzleloading muskets and rifles, Federal breech-loading carbines and rifles, Federal pistols and revolvers and Confederate ordnance, the attention to detail, scholarship and downright passion for the subject is evident in every page.
Muzzleloaders were obsolete by the late 1860s when the cap, powder, and projectile were put into a brass cartridge and breech-loading firearms were introduced.
Uberti of Brescia, Italy, has been producing historically correct replicas of this famous falling-block, breech-loading single shot, available as a 28-inch barreled carbine and both 30--and 32-inch-barreled straight-stocked Sporting Rifles as well as a Special Sporting Rifle with pistol grip stock.
In contrast, conventional breech-loading systems automatically reload the gun, meaning that it might be necessary to fire off an inappropriate round before the right type of ammunition for the circumstances can be selected.
During the American Civil War a Remington employee, Joseph Rider, designed a breech-loading carbine known as the First Model or "Split Breech," which they attempted, unsuccessfully, to sell to the Union army.