breeches


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breech

 (brēch)
n.
1. The lower rear portion of the human trunk; the buttocks.
2.
a. A breech presentation or delivery.
b. A fetus in breech presentation.
3. breeches
a. Knee breeches.
b. Informal Pants.
c. Tight-fitting pants for horseback riding, often including a wide layer of coarse material such as leather centered along the inseam to provide improved grip.
4. The part of a firearm behind the barrel.
5. The lower part of a pulley block.

[Middle English brech, from Old English brēc, pl. of brōc, leg covering, Gaulish brāca, hose, trousers.]

breeches

(ˈbrɪtʃɪz; ˈbriː-)
pl n
1. (Clothing & Fashion) trousers extending to the knee or just below, worn for riding, mountaineering, etc
2. (Clothing & Fashion) informal or dialect any trousers
3. too big for one's breeches conceited; unduly self-confident

breech•es

(ˈbrɪtʃ ɪz)

n. (used with a pl. v.)
1. knee-length trousers, often with buckles or decoration at the bottoms, worn by men in the 17th to early 19th centuries.
3. Informal. trousers.
Idioms:
too big for one's breeches, more insolent and conceited than is warranted by one's position or abilities.
[1125–75; Middle English, pl. of breech]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.breeches - trousers ending above the kneebreeches - trousers ending above the knee  
britches - informal term for breeches
buckskins - breeches made of buckskin
codpiece - (15th-16th century) a flap for the crotch of men's tight-fitting breeches
plus fours - men's baggy knickers hanging below the knees; formerly worn for sports (especially golf)
trouser, pant - (usually in the plural) a garment extending from the waist to the knee or ankle, covering each leg separately; "he had a sharp crease in his trousers"
trunk hose - puffed breeches of the 16th and 17th centuries usually worn over hose
plural, plural form - the form of a word that is used to denote more than one
Translations
سروال، بنطلون بريتشيز
kraťasy
=-bukserknæbukser
buxur; reiîbuxur
bridžiaikelnės
bikses līdz ceļiem

breeches

[ˈbriːtʃɪz]
A. NPLcalzones mpl
riding breechespantalones mpl de montar
to wear the breechesllevar los pantalones or calzones
B. CPD breeches buoy N (Naut) → boya f pantalón

breeches

[ˈbrɪtʃɪz ˈbriːtʃɪz] npl (old-fashioned)culotte f

breeches

plKniehose f; (= riding breeches)Reithose f; (for hiking) → (Knie)bundhose f

breeches

[ˈbrɪtʃɪz] npl (knee breeches) → calzoni mpl alla zuava; (riding breeches) → pantaloni mpl da cavallo

breeches

(ˈbritʃiz) , ((American) ˈbri:-) noun plural
trousers, especially ones coming just below the knee. riding breeches.
References in classic literature ?
Yes, and the very colors in them loud countrified Sunday clothes--plaid breeches, green and black--"
Leather straps to the bottoms of the breeches legs and one of them hanging unbottoned--"
     His blazing breeches and high-towering cap --
He is a tall, pock-pitted lad, very black hair, and wore a blue coat and metal buttons, an old red vest, and breeches of the same colour.
I first declined the proposal, and pretended business, but as he was very earnest and pressing, hunger at last overcame my pride, and I fairly confessed to him I had no money in my pocket; yet not without framing a lie for an excuse, and imputing it to my having changed my breeches that morning.
Some people," cries Partridge, "ought to have good memories; or did you find just money enough in your breeches to pay for the mutton-chop?
Breeches of crimson velvet, silk stockings, and low, silver-buckled slippers completed his costume.
Just then, whether it was the cold of the morning that was now approaching, or that he had eaten something laxative at supper, or that it was only natural (as is most likely), Sancho felt a desire to do what no one could do for him; but so great was the fear that had penetrated his heart, he dared not separate himself from his master by as much as the black of his nail; to escape doing what he wanted was, however, also impossible; so what he did for peace's sake was to remove his right hand, which held the back of the saddle, and with it to untie gently and silently the running string which alone held up his breeches, so that on loosening it they at once fell down round his feet like fetters; he then raised his shirt as well as he could and bared his hind quarters, no slim ones.
Beneath, there were a vest and breeches of red plush, somewhat worn and soiled.
Two footmen were standing ready, dressed in drab livery, with scarlet breeches and white stockings.
One of the next arrivals was a stout, heavily built young man with close-cropped hair, spectacles, the light-colored breeches fashionable at that time, a very high ruffle, and a brown dress coat.
And he bent his long legs, swatched in tight riding breeches, and sat down in the chair, too low for him, so that his knees were cramped up in a sharp angle.