breviary

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Related to breviaries: Liturgy of the Hours

bre·vi·ar·y

 (brē′vē-ĕr′ē, brĕv′ē-)
n. pl. bre·vi·ar·ies Ecclesiastical
A book containing the hymns, offices, and prayers for the canonical hours.

[Middle English breviarie, from Old French breviaire, from Medieval Latin breviārium, from Latin, summary, from brevis, short; see brief.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

breviary

(ˈbriːvjərɪ)
n, pl -ries
1. (Roman Catholic Church) RC Church a book of psalms, hymns, prayers, etc, to be recited daily by clerics in major orders and certain members of religious orders as part of the divine office
2. (Eastern Church (Greek & Russian Orthodox)) a similar book in the Orthodox Church
[C16: from Latin breviārium an abridged version, from breviāre to shorten, from brevis short]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

bre•vi•ar•y

(ˈbri viˌɛr i, ˈbrɛv i-)

n., pl. -ar•ies.
a book containing the psalms, readings, and prayers to be recited in the divine office.
[1540–50; < Latin breviārium an abridgment =brevi(s) short + -ārium -ary]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

breviary

Catholicism. a book containing the prayers, lessons, etc., needed by a priest for the reading of his daily office.
See also: Books
a book containing the prayers, lessons, etc., needed by a priest for the reading of his daily office.
See also: Catholicism
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.breviary - (Roman Catholic Church) a book of prayers to be recited daily certain priests and members of religious orders
prayer book, prayerbook - a book containing prayers
Church of Rome, Roman Catholic Church, Roman Church, Western Church, Roman Catholic - the Christian Church based in the Vatican and presided over by a pope and an episcopal hierarchy
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
breviář
breviar
breviar
časoslov
требник

breviary

[ˈbriːvɪərɪ] N (Rel) → breviario m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

breviary

nBrevier nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
They then went on, and upon the green at the entrance of the town they came upon the curate and the bachelor Samson Carrasco busy with their breviaries. It should be mentioned that Sancho had thrown, by way of a sumpter-cloth, over Dapple and over the bundle of armour, the buckram robe painted with flames which they had put upon him at the duke's castle the night Altisidora came back to life.
The majority of manuscripts are liturgical (Books of Hours, Psalters, Missals, Graduals, Breviaries, Pontificals, Evangeliaries, Prayer-books, Antiphonaries, sermon collections, and Bibles), but there are also works by Peter Comestor, Cyprian, Boethius, Buridan, Pope Boniface VIII, Catherine of Siena, Isidore of Seville, Giles of Rome, Peter Lombard, and others.
The hospital provides funding for religious articles, such as Bibles in different languages, rosaries, breviaries and holy cards, but other articles and outreach related to Catholic sacramental life are highly dependent on the efforts of chaplains and trained volunteers, and in the case of reconciliation or the sacrament of the sick, can only be administered by priests.
They concentrate on the Psalter as a devotional book and include Breviaries, Antiphonals, and Books of Hours, in which the Psalms appear as they were used in the medieval liturgy, but not whole Bibles, in which the Psalms also appear but not as liturgy.
The Sons of Thunder, however, needed their breviaries to pray the liturgy of the hours.
(There is also a discography for those works that have appeared on CD.) Perhaps to make things easier on readers who do not have access to early Spanish breviaries or antiphoners, Marin gives modern chant-book assignments (e.g.
Three essays delve into texts and practice at Salisbury Cathedral, with discussion of the role of Old Sarum in processions at Salisbury, and analysis of Sarum missals and breviaries. Other topics include analysis of individual manuscripts, including Pembroke College 302 and the Becket Virgil; analysis of the Latin glosses of the Old English Boethius; an attempt to identify Gilbert the Englishman; and evidence concerning priests and pastoral care in early Anglo-Saxon England.