breviary


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Related to breviary: Liturgy of the Hours

bre·vi·ar·y

 (brē′vē-ĕr′ē, brĕv′ē-)
n. pl. bre·vi·ar·ies Ecclesiastical
A book containing the hymns, offices, and prayers for the canonical hours.

[Middle English breviarie, from Old French breviaire, from Medieval Latin breviārium, from Latin, summary, from brevis, short; see brief.]

breviary

(ˈbriːvjərɪ)
n, pl -ries
1. (Roman Catholic Church) RC Church a book of psalms, hymns, prayers, etc, to be recited daily by clerics in major orders and certain members of religious orders as part of the divine office
2. (Eastern Church (Greek & Russian Orthodox)) a similar book in the Orthodox Church
[C16: from Latin breviārium an abridged version, from breviāre to shorten, from brevis short]

bre•vi•ar•y

(ˈbri viˌɛr i, ˈbrɛv i-)

n., pl. -ar•ies.
a book containing the psalms, readings, and prayers to be recited in the divine office.
[1540–50; < Latin breviārium an abridgment =brevi(s) short + -ārium -ary]

breviary

Catholicism. a book containing the prayers, lessons, etc., needed by a priest for the reading of his daily office.
See also: Books
a book containing the prayers, lessons, etc., needed by a priest for the reading of his daily office.
See also: Catholicism
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.breviary - (Roman Catholic Church) a book of prayers to be recited daily certain priests and members of religious orders
prayer book, prayerbook - a book containing prayers
Church of Rome, Roman Catholic Church, Roman Church, Western Church, Roman Catholic - the Christian Church based in the Vatican and presided over by a pope and an episcopal hierarchy
Translations
breviář
breviar
breviar
časoslov
требник

breviary

[ˈbriːvɪərɪ] N (Rel) → breviario m

breviary

nBrevier nt
References in classic literature ?
Yes, but I have my breviary to repeat," answered Aramis; "then some verses to compose, which Madame d'Aiguillon begged of me.
But the inheritance consisted in this only, a scrap of paper on which Spada had written: -- `I bequeath to my beloved nephew my coffers, my books, and, amongst others, my breviary with the gold corners, which I beg he will preserve in remembrance of his affectionate uncle.
The heirs sought everywhere, admired the breviary, laid hands on the furniture, and were greatly astonished that Spada, the rich man, was really the most miserable of uncles -- no treasures -- unless they were those of science, contained in the library and laboratories.
The celebrated breviary remained in the family, and was in the count's possession.
He had reserved from his annuity his family papers, his library, composed of five thousand volumes, and his famous breviary.
In 1807, a month before I was arrested, and a fortnight after the death of the Count of Spada, on the 25th of December (you will see presently how the date became fixed in my memory), I was reading, for the thousandth time, the papers I was arranging, for the palace was sold to a stranger, and I was going to leave Rome and settle at Florence, intending to take with me twelve thousand francs I possessed, my library, and the famous breviary, when, tired with my constant labor at the same thing, and overcome by a heavy dinner I had eaten, my head dropped on my hands, and I fell asleep about three o'clock in the afternoon.
The last Count of Spada, moreover, made me his heir, bequeathing to me this symbolic breviary, he bequeathed to me all it contained; no, no, make your mind satisfied on that point.
Because you always think you have on your shoulders your beadle's robe, and spend all your time reading your breviary.
The Abbot was left to himself once more, and bent his thin gray face over his illuminated breviary.
Did your master read his breviary during the night?
Which is turning out his pockets," said Father Brown, and proceeded to do so, displaying seven and sixpence, a return ticket, a small silver crucifix, a small breviary, and a stick of chocolate.
It has previously been incorrectly identified as being from a breviary, an identification perhaps derived from the use of the word "officium" in the fragment.