brigand


Also found in: Thesaurus, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

brig·and

 (brĭg′ənd)
n.
A robber or bandit, especially one of an outlaw band.

[Middle English brigaunt, from Old French, from Old Italian brigante, skirmisher, from present participle of brigare, to fight; see brigade.]

brig′and·age (-ən-dĭj), brig′and·ism n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

brigand

(ˈbrɪɡənd)
n
(Professions) a bandit or plunderer, esp a member of a gang operating in mountainous areas
[C14: from Old French, from Old Italian brigante fighter, from brigare to fight, from briga strife, of Celtic origin]
ˈbrigandage, ˈbrigandry n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

brig•and

(ˈbrɪg ənd)

n.
a bandit.
[1350–1400; Middle English briga(u)nt < Middle French brigand < early Italian brigante member of an armed company]
brig′and•age, n.
brig′and•ish, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.brigand - an armed thief who is (usually) a member of a bandbrigand - an armed thief who is (usually) a member of a band
stealer, thief - a criminal who takes property belonging to someone else with the intention of keeping it or selling it
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

brigand

noun bandit, outlaw, robber, gangster, plunderer, highwayman, desperado, marauder, ruffian, freebooter, footpad (archaic) He looked like a scruffy brigand.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
zbojník
rosvo
לסטיםשודד
briganti

brigand

[ˈbrɪgənd] Nbandido m, bandolero m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

brigand

[ˈbrɪgənd] n (literary) (= bandit) → bandit m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

brigand

n (old)Räuber m, → Bandit m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

brigand

[ˈbrɪgənd] nbandito, brigante m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
The brigand captain took the large paper from the attendant brigand and, glancing over it, continued: "My other intentions are clearly set forth in this public document, which I will hand round in a moment; and which after that will be posted on a tree by every village in the valley, and every cross-road in the hills.
Tupman in full brigand's costume, with a very tight jacket, sitting like a pincushion over his back and shoulders, the upper portion of his legs incased in the velvet shorts, and the lower part thereof swathed in the complicated bandages to which all brigands are peculiarly attached.
The light cart in which the Brigand usually made his perambulations being gaily dressed with flags and streamers, and the Brigand placed therein, contemplating the miniature of his beloved as usual, Nell was accommodated with a seat beside him, decorated with artificial flowers, and in this state and ceremony rode slowly through the town every morning, dispersing handbills from a basket, to the sound of drum and trumpet.
"Thereupon the brigand offers to go along with her, and she accepts his offer.
Remorselessly to rob you, an orphan, as any brigand might do?
A frowsy, bearded brigand sprang into the road with a shout, and flourished a musket in the light of the moon!
The Cour des Miracles was, in fact, merely a dram-shop; but a brigand's dram-shop, reddened quite as much with blood as with wine.
And I think that was the vision that had remained with him always, dazzling his eyes so that he could not see the truth; and notwithstanding the brutality of fact, he continued to see with the eyes of the spirit an Italy of romantic brigands and picturesque ruins.
"They are regular brigands, especially Dolokhov," replied the visitor.
Am I, forsooth, in a den of thieves, -- in a cave of brigands? Yes, but the Governor shall know all to-morrow, and his Highness the Stadtholder the day after.
Constantinople was taken, plundered, and destroyed by these "pious brigands,"* and the last of the Byzantine Emperors was first blinded and then flung from a high tower, so that his body fell shattered to pieces on the paving-stones of his own capital.
His masters called out not to lay on so hard and to leave him alone, but the muleteers blood was up, and he did not care to drop the game until he had vented the rest of his wrath, and gathering up the remaining fragments of the lance he finished with a discharge upon the unhappy victim, who all through the storm of sticks that rained on him never ceased threatening heaven, and earth, and the brigands, for such they seemed to him.