brinelling

brinelling

(ˈbrɪnɛlɪŋ)
n
(Metallurgy) a localized surface corrosion; a cause of damage to bearings
References in periodicals archive ?
Loads on the motor bearings are relatively small but vibrations are high and so the bearings are spring preloaded to minimise tolerance stack-up, which again helps to prevent false brinelling.
These signs of localised damage (and widespread damage in some cases) appeared in many forms including abrasive wear, adhesive wear, spalling, fatigue, corrosion, fretting, cracks, indentations, discolouration, false brinelling and degradation/starvation of grease.
The low friction grease contributes to reduce the friction maintaining the same bearing performance in terms of life, stiffness, sealing, false brinelling.
Heavy shocks may scratch or cause other damage to the bearing, while physical impact may result in brinelling, breaking or cracking.
Please confirm that the impeller comes to rest at a different location - no brinelling has occurred.
Along with the material research, the company also reviewed coating technologies, which are critical to achieving micro-sealing and minimizing the effects of both thermal and mechanical stresses, such as galling and brinelling.
An insidious form of bearing failure is false brinelling, which occurs when an unused motor is exposed to vibrations.
Steel construction provides maximum working pressures and burst strength and prevents brinelling.
However, even low-voltage current passing between a ball and race in contact can cause rapid heating and lead to false Brinelling, Macdonald said.
All of the weight and force is concentrated on the points of contact, creating very high pressures which can lead to brinelling.
These signs of localised damage (and widespread damage in some cases) appeared in many forms--including abrasive wear, adhesive wear, spalling, fatigue, corrosion, fretting, cracks, indentations, discolouration, false Brinelling and degradation/starvation of grease.