brisket

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brisket

bris·ket

 (brĭs′kĭt)
n.
1. The chest of an animal.
2. The ribs and meat taken from the chest of an animal.

[Middle English brusket, perhaps of Scandinavian origin; akin to Old Norse brjōsk, cartilage.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

brisket

(ˈbrɪskɪt)
n
1. (Zoology) the breast of a four-legged animal
2. (Cookery) the meat from this part, esp of beef
[C14: probably of Scandinavian origin; related to Old Norse brjōsk gristle, Norwegian and Danish brusk]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

bris•ket

(ˈbrɪs kɪt)

n.
1. the breast of an animal, or the part of the breast lying next to the ribs.
2. a cut of meat, esp. beef, from this part.
[1300–50; Middle English brusket]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.brisket - a cut of meat from the breast or lower chest especially of beefbrisket - a cut of meat from the breast or lower chest especially of beef
cut of meat, cut - a piece of meat that has been cut from an animal carcass
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

brisket

[ˈbrɪskɪt] Ncarne f de pecho (para asar)
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

brisket

[ˈbrɪskɪt] npoitrine f de bœuf
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

brisket

n (Cook) → Bruststück nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

brisket

[ˈbrɪskɪt] npunta di petto
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
At last he cried, "Cleave him to the brisket!" but without conviction.
Their adventures saw them help cook for a rodeo in Houston (smoking 50 briskets, 300 chickens, and 500 racks of spare rib), help an old mountain man repair his even older drum smoker deep in the Appalachians, and being entrusted with spice rub secrets that they have to "take to the grave".
Upon arrival, our group was brought to a barbecue competition, where we sampled past winners-dry and wet ribs, beef briskets, baked beans, coleslaw.
Sadler's Smokehouse Briskets are available at McDade's Markets, Kroger, and Wal-Mart.
"Owens briskets are smoked over a hickory wood for hours, so our customers can enjoy it in minutes."
Frozen navel end briskets have increased 115 yen per kilogram in the past week to 775 yen, MLA said in its weekly market report.
Working with USDA Choice cuts of beef, Ki Soon Rhee and her colleagues trimmed all external fat from half of their strip-loin steaks and one side of each roast (top rounds, briskets, eye of rounds and arm pot roasts).
Corned beef, ham hocks, beef briskets, tongues and chipped beef were considered to be "cheap" budget-stretchers because they were not "desirable" cuts of meats.
The restaurant was opened in Barry in 2016 by Sam Evans and Shauna Guinn, who started winning over Cardiff with their brisket and ribs at a pop-up at the The Canadian pub in Splott, in 2013.
Primarily I use tin foil for slow-cooking brisket after it has smoked in my smoker.
* A nice, lean brisket is always hard to find, but this Passover was more difficult than most.