osteogenesis imperfecta

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osteogenesis im·per·fec·ta

 (ĭm′pər-fĕk′tə)
n.
A genetic disease marked by abnormal fragility and plasticity of bone, with recurring fractures resulting from minimal trauma.

[New Latin : osteogenesis + Latin imperfecta, feminine of imperfectus, incomplete.]

osteogenesis imperfecta

(ˌɪmpəˈfɛktə)
n
(Pathology) a hereditary disease caused by a collagen abnormality, causing fragility of the skeleton which results in fractures and deformities. Also called: brittle bone syndrome
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.osteogenesis imperfecta - autosomal dominant disorder of connective tissue characterized by brittle bones that fracture easily
autosomal dominant disease, autosomal dominant disorder - a disease caused by a dominant mutant gene on an autosome
Translations

osteogenesis imperfecta

n osteogénesis imperfecta
References in classic literature ?
Eats flesh and bone away, It eats the brittle bones by night,
Osteoporosis, commonly known as brittle bones, is diagnosed when bone mass is below average and decreases at a higher than normal rate.
Osteogenesis imperfecta Osteogenesis imperfecta, also known as brittle bone disease, or OI, is a congenital bone disorder characterized by brittle bones prone to fracture.
No one told us when we were teenagers about brittle bones, flu jabs and falling over sober.
WRINKLES could be an early indication of brittle bones in middle-aged women, research suggests.
Prosecutor Raj Punia said the 63-year-old woman, who has restricted mobility and suffers from brittle bones, had known Russell for about six years.
A TREATMENT for brittle bones has a dramatic effect on breast cancer when combined with chemotherapy, research has shown.
A SCHOOLGIRL with a painful form of arthritis is helping doctors find out how to stop thousands like her developing an even more debilitating condition - brittle bones.
Cathy Leibman, Director of Operations at the Emirates Arthritis Foundation (EAF), recently addressed parents from the American School of Dubai (ASD) about the issues surrounding 'brittle bones,' including the prevention of Osteoporosis.
Sonia said: "We had to give Sarah every chance of life that we could and we knew the best chance was to move to Sheffield where there were experts in brittle bones.
Both depression and fracture due to brittle bones become more common after age 50, and the authors said the elevated risk of fractures linked to antidepressant use "may have important public health consequences." They urged more study into the issue to confirm the study's findings.