brocket

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brock·et

 (brŏk′ĭt)
n.
Any of several small South American deer of the genus Mazama, having short unbranched horns.

[Middle English broket, two- or three-year-old male red deer with its first horns, from Old French brocard, from broque, animal's horn, dialectal variant of broche, spit; see broach1.]

brocket

(ˈbrɒkɪt)
n
(Animals) any small deer of the genus Mazama, of tropical America, having small unbranched antlers
[C15: from Anglo-French broquet, from broque horn, from Vulgar Latin brocca (unattested); see broach1]

brock•et

(ˈbrɒk ɪt)

n.
1. any of several small, red South American deer of the genus Mazama, having unbranched antlers.
2. the male red deer in the second year, with the first growth of horns.
[1375–1425; late Middle English broket < Anglo-French broquet, derivative of broque horn]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.brocket - small South American deer with unbranched antlersbrocket - small South American deer with unbranched antlers
cervid, deer - distinguished from Bovidae by the male's having solid deciduous antlers
genus Mazama, Mazama - brockets
2.brocket - male red deer in its second year
Cervus elaphus, red deer, wapiti, American elk, elk - common deer of temperate Europe and Asia
References in periodicals archive ?
Brockets are small tropical deer, typically with short, straight spikes for antlers, only occasionally branching into forks.
Neither comes easy, but in this area, gray-brown brockets probably outnumber the reds by about 10 to one.
But, as usual, it was Christine Hamilton who earned the Disgraced title by grabbing her very own lord by the Brockets.
HAPPIER: Isa at home in Puerto Rico; Picture: CHRIS BOTT; EVENING HALL: Brockets in their old dining room; DOWNFALL: Lord Brocket with classic car collection; BEFORE THE SPLIT: Lord Brocket and Isa in 1993; Picture: RICHARD YOUNG/REX FEATURES
LORD Brocket was not the obvious candidate to emerge as a sex symbol.
In 1997, the Brockets were cited by Tony Blair ina speech attacking hereditary peers.
"Charlie's realised he wants to settle down and have little Brockets. I just need to decide if he's the right man for me."
We assumed that these values were related to general levels of brocket deer activity, although it is not known if brockets are territorial with discrete home ranges.
In 1997, the Brockets were cited by Tony Blair in a speech attacking heredi-tary peers.
As I had a few years earlier, we hunted the brocket deer by calling, waiting and still-hunting, but there were a lot more brockets in this area.
This was a really difficult hunt in thick jungle, but the brockets were there.