bromine


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bro·mine

 (brō′mēn)
n. Symbol Br
A dense, volatile, corrosive, reddish-brown, nonmetallic liquid halogen element that exists as a diatomic molecule, Br2 having a highly irritating vapor. Chiefly isolated from brines, it is used in producing fumigants, dyes, water purification compounds, and photographic chemicals. Atomic weight 79.904; atomic number 35; melting point -7.2°C; boiling point 58.8°C; density of gas 7.59 grams per liter; specific gravity (liquid, at 20°C) 3.12; valence 1, 3, 5, 7. See Periodic Table.

[French brome (from Greek brōmos, stench) + -ine.]

bromine

(ˈbrəʊmiːn; -mɪn)
n
(Elements & Compounds) a pungent dark red volatile liquid element of the halogen series that occurs in natural brine and is used in the production of chemicals, esp ethylene dibromide. Symbol: Br; atomic no: 35; atomic wt: 79.904; valency: 1, 3, 5, or 7; relative density 3.12; density (gas): 7.59 kg/m3; melting pt: –7.2°C; boiling pt: 58.78°C
[C19: from French brome bromine, from Greek brōmos bad smell + -ine2, of uncertain origin]

bro•mine

(ˈbroʊ min, -mɪn)

n.
a dark reddish, fuming, toxic liquid element obtained from natural brines and ocean water and used chiefly in gasoline antiknock compounds, pharmaceuticals, and dyes. Symbol: Br; at. wt.: 79.909; at. no.: 35; sp. gr.: 3.119 at 20°C.
[1827; < French brome bromine (< Greek brômos stench) + -ine2]

bro·mine

(brō′mēn)
Symbol Br A reddish-brown halogen element that can be found in combined form in ocean water. The pure form is a nonmetallic liquid that gives off a highly irritating vapor. It is used to make dyes, sedatives, and photographic film. Atomic number 35. See Periodic Table.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bromine - a nonmetallic heavy volatile corrosive dark brown liquid element belonging to the halogensbromine - a nonmetallic heavy volatile corrosive dark brown liquid element belonging to the halogens; found in sea water
chemical element, element - any of the more than 100 known substances (of which 92 occur naturally) that cannot be separated into simpler substances and that singly or in combination constitute all matter
halogen - any of five related nonmetallic elements (fluorine or chlorine or bromine or iodine or astatine) that are all monovalent and readily form negative ions
brine, saltwater, seawater - water containing salts; "the water in the ocean is all saltwater"
Translations
бром
brom
brom
bromo
broom
bromi
brom
bróm
bróm
bromas
broms
brom
bróm
brom
brom
бром
brom

bromine

[ˈbrəʊmiːn] Nbromo m

bromine

[ˈbrəʊmiːn] nbromo

bromine

n bromo
References in periodicals archive ?
Stable Demand in Catalysts in Bromine: Albemarle's Bromine and Catalyst segments generally serve mature markets that grow at or around GDP levels.
Tests showed that, under simulated stomach conditions, several toys released quantities of bromine, cadmium or lead which exceeded safety limits.
A statement from Dwellings Academy yesterday said: "At 9.45am today a Year 10 student inadvertently and mistakenly opened a bottle of bromine water during a science lesson, a substance which can cause breathing difficulties and irritation if it comes into contact with skin.
DCHC was established to further explore and develop natural gas and brine resources (including bromine and crude salt) in China.
Albemarle Corporation (NYSE: ALB), a company involved in the global specialty chemicals industry, is increasing the price of certain brominated flame retardants and bromine derivatives effective January 1, 2017.
The extensive use of bromide compounds as clear brine fluids in oil and gas industries is one of the primary factors driving growth of the global bromine derivatives market.
The head of the firefighting brigades for the south, Moshe Swisa, described the incident: "There was a crash between two trains carrying bromine from the Dead Sea, and it seems there was a lack of communication between the two trains.
Previously, scientists knew that animals had bromine in their bodies, but researchers could find no biological use for it.
The researchers, led by co-first authors Scott McCall, Christopher Cummings, Ph.D., and Gautam (Jay) Bhave, M.D., Ph.D., showed that fruit flies died when bromine was removed from their diet but survived when bromine was restored.
The molarities of zinc-bromine solution are about 4 mol/L so that the amount is nearly half of the optimal value not only for the conductivity but also for the bromine solubility [14-17].