brooding


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brood

 (bro͞od)
n.
1. The young of certain animals, especially a group of young birds hatched at one time and cared for together.
2. The children in one family.
v. brood·ed, brood·ing, broods
v.intr.
1.
a. To focus the attention on a subject persistently and moodily; worry: brooded about his future; brooded over the insult for several days.
b. To be depressed: All he seemed to do was sit and brood.
2.
a. To sit on or hatch eggs.
b. To protect developing eggs or young.
3. To hover envelopingly; hang: Mist brooded over the moor.
v.tr.
1. To think about (something) persistently or moodily: brooded that her work might come to nothing.
2.
a. To sit on or hatch (eggs).
b. To protect (developing eggs or young).
adj.
Kept for breeding: a brood hen.

[Middle English, from Old English brōd; see bhreu- in Indo-European roots.]

brood′ing·ly adv.
Synonyms: brood, dwell, fret1, mope, worry
These verbs mean to turn something over in the mind moodily and at length: brooding about his decline in popularity; dwelled on her defeat; fretted over the loss of his job; moping about his illness; worrying about the unpaid bills.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.brooding - sitting on eggs so as to hatch them by the warmth of the bodybrooding - sitting on eggs so as to hatch them by the warmth of the body
birthing, giving birth, parturition, birth - the process of giving birth
2.brooding - persistent morbid meditation on a problem
melancholy - a feeling of thoughtful sadness
Adj.1.brooding - deeply or seriously thoughtful; "Byron lives on not only in his poetry, but also in his creation of the 'Byronic hero' - the persona of a brooding melancholy young man";
thoughtful - exhibiting or characterized by careful thought; "a thoughtful paper"

brooding

adjective gloomy, troubled, depressed, moody, glum, dejected, despondent, downcast, morose A heavy, brooding silence descended on them.
Translations

brooding

[ˈbruːdɪŋ] ADJ [evil, presence etc] → siniestro, amenazador

brooding

[ˈbruːdɪŋ] (literary) adj
(= ominous) [silence, atmosphere] → troublant(e)
(= thoughtful) [eyes, look] → soucieux/euse
References in classic literature ?
Roscoe Sherriff was prowling about the house, brooding on campaigns of publicity.
There was a brooding expression in his deep-set eyes.
Helen replied that she had no intention of brooding on such a dull subject.
So as not to wake me," replied the Writer of Fables, a holy calm brooding upon his beautiful face.
He ate and drank, for he was exhausted - but he little knew or cared what; and he wandered about in the chill rain, thinking and thinking, and brooding and brooding.
Brooding over all these matters, the mother felt like one who has evoked a spirit, but, by some irregularity in the process of conjuration, has failed to win the master-word that should control this new and incomprehensible intelligence.
He was brooding over these, preparatory to opening them, at the very moment when Adolf addressed him.
And she had misgivings and fears which she dared not acknowledge to herself, though she was always secretly brooding over them.
The air was dark above Gravesend, and farther back still seemed condensed into a mournful gloom, brooding mo- tionless over the biggest, and the greatest, town on earth.
In all the earlier years when her babies were young, carking cares and anxieties darkened the fireside with their brooding wings.
He had seen men before with the jungle madness upon them--the madness of solitude and unrestrained brooding, and perhaps a touch of fever.
For all Jerry might have known, though he pondered it not, Malaita was a universe, beheaded and resting on the knees of some brooding lesser god, himself vastly mightier than Bashti whose knees bore the brooding weight of Skipper's sun-dried, smoke-cured head, this lesser god vexed and questing, feeling and guessing at the dual twin-mysteries of time and space and of motion and matter, above, beneath, around, and beyond him.