broodings

Related to broodings: resonant, plaintive, guttural, sonorous
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broodings

[ˈbruːdɪŋs] NPLmeditaciones fpl
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It was a bliss to which every sort of earthly experience--all that he had enjoyed, or suffered or seen, or heard, or acted, with the broodings of his soul upon the whole--had contributed somewhat.
The peace of the woods was upon him, despite his broodings of Marian and he paid little heed to a group of does quietly feeding among the trees at the far edge of the glade.
She only roused herself from the broodings of this restless agitation, to let Mrs Clay know that she had been seen with Mr Elliot three hours after his being supposed to be out of Bath, for having watched in vain for some intimation of the interview from the lady herself, she determined to mention it, and it seemed to her there was guilt in Mrs Clay's face as she listened.
have been seen as the broodings of an ousted politician, forecasting anarchy under the new Liberal regime.
Forced feelings won't stretch fully; [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], also "stronger resolves" Weaker broodings waned yet wax anew.
Her diary written in English does not record "sentimental effusions of rejected love, eruptions of familial anger, or consoling broodings about death" (1989: 121).
Carter's writing for wind quartet turns the setting into a kind of melancholy pastoral, tenderness for Harriet (Teneramente) punctuated by ominous broodings about his own end (froni co).
Consider, for example, David Wojahn's elegiac depiction of the pathetic descent from musical authenticity to self-destruction and commercial compromise in the sonnet sequence Mystery Train; rock journalist Nick Kent's lurid expose of the seamy underbelly of pop glamour in The Dark Stuff; Love's sun-tinged apocalyptic broodings in Forever Changes; or the Pretty Things' dark, humorless odyssey from youthful innocence to the despair and abjection of old age in S.
Indeed, Fiedler's assertion about the "proper subject of the American Gothic" was in some ways a clarification and reassertion of the well-known conclusion of Richard Wright's essay, "How Bigger Was Born": "[W]e do have in the oppression of the Negro a shadow athwart our national life dense enough to satisfy even the gloomy broodings of Hawthorne.
Catherine's broodings while she is reading Udolpho are typically of "'towers and long galleries'" (85), "narrow, winding vaults" (88), "broken arches, .
Unsurprisingly, however, Kafka's epistolary broodings turn out to include quite a few paradoxes; and they give his text signifying possibilities that trouble Volkov's reading.
Sleigh's poem is one of the most recent examples of a small but significant sub-genre of American poetry which turns the broodings of an insomniac self into an emblem of the human condition.