brought


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Related to brought: brought forth, brought out

brought

 (brôt)
v.
Past tense and past participle of bring.

brought

(brɔːt)
vb
the past tense and past participle of bring

bring

(brɪŋ)

v.t. brought, bring•ing.
1. to carry, convey, conduct, or cause (someone or something) to come with, to, or toward the speaker.
2. to cause to come to or toward oneself; attract.
3. to cause to occur or exist: The medicine brought rapid relief.
4. to cause to come into a particular position, state, or effect: to bring a car to a stop.
5. to persuade, compel, or induce: I couldn't bring myself to sell it.
6. to cause to come to mind; evoke; recall: to bring back happy memories.
7. to sell for; fetch: These lamps will bring a good price.
8. Law. to commence: to bring an action for damages.
9. bring about, to accomplish; cause.
10. bring around or round,
a. to convince of a belief or opinion; persuade.
b. to restore to consciousness, as after a faint.
11. bring down,
a. to injure, capture, or kill.
b. to cause to fall.
c. to cause to be in low spirits; depress.
d. Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. to present (a report, bill, etc.) in a parliament.
12. bring forth,
a. to give birth to or produce; bear: to bring forth young.
b. to give rise to; introduce.
13. bring forward,
a. to bring to view; show.
b. to present for consideration; adduce.
14. bring in,
a. to yield, as profits or income.
b. to present officially; submit: to bring in a verdict.
c. to cause to operate or yield: to bring in an oil well.
d. to introduce.
15. bring off, to accomplish, carry out, or achieve.
16. bring on, to cause to happen, appear, or exist: to bring on a headache.
17. bring out,
a. to reveal or expose.
b. to make noticeable or conspicuous; emphasize.
c. to cause to appear: The clams I ate brought out a rash.
d. to publish or produce.
e. to introduce formally into society.
18. bring to,
a. to bring back to consciousness; revive.
b. to head (a vessel) close to or into the wind so as to halt.
19. bring up,
a. to care for during childhood; rear.
b. to introduce or mention for attention or consideration.
c. to vomit.
d. to stop quickly or abruptly.
[before 950; Middle English; Old English bringan]
bring′er, n.
Translations

brought

pret & pp de bring
References in classic literature ?
From there I hired a motor-car and brought him here."
Is she still alive, or has she died?' But the king replied: 'She let my dear son be torn to pieces by wild beasts; I will not have her named.' Then the huntsman arose and said: 'Gracious lord father she is alive still, and I am her son, and I was not carried away by wild beasts, but by that wretch the old cook, who tore me from her arms when she was asleep, and sprinkled her apron with the blood of a chicken.' Thereupon he took the dog with the golden collar, and said: 'That is the wretch!' and caused live coals to be brought, and these the dog was compelled to devour before the sight of all, until flames burst forth from its throat.
bread, rice, three Dutch cheeses, five pieces of dried goat's flesh (which we lived much upon), and a little remainder of European corn, which had been laid by for some fowls which we brought to sea with us, but the fowls were killed.
There was also a dispute at Phocea, concerning a right of inheritance, between Mnasis, the father of Mnasis, and Euthucrates, the father of Onomarchus, which brought on the Phoceans the sacred war.
Dmitri, a man of good family who had been brought up in the count's house and now managed all his affairs, stepped softly into the room.
No one seemed to have a very clear idea of what was required, but all had brought something.
It was from Ireland that the Scots came to Scotland, and when they came they brought with them many tales.
At first he accepted much of what people brought him--tea, sugar, white bread, milk, clothing, and fire-wood.
It was an evil day for me when first I clapped eyes upon the merchant Achmet and had to do with the Agra treasure, which never brought anything but a curse yet upon the man who owned it.
"There!" said he, "he will be brought to your majesty."
"I will bind up your poor little leg, and Zephyr shall rock you to sleep." So she folded the cool leaves tenderly about the poor fly, bathed his wings, and brought him refreshing drink, while he hummed his thanks, and forgot his pain, as Zephyr softly sung and fanned him with her waving wings.
She it was who once received from gold-throned Hera and brought up fell, cruel Typhaon to be a plague to men.