brown fat


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brown fat

n.
One of two types of fatty tissue in mammals, especially in newborn infants and hibernating animals, that is composed of dark-colored cells containing numerous mitochondria and lipids, which are converted into body heat.

brown fat

n
(Physiology) tissue composed of a type of fat cell that dissipates as heat most of the energy released when food is oxidized; brown adipose tissue. It is present in hibernating animals and human babies and is thought to be important in adult weight control

brown′ fat′


n.
brownish yellow adipose tissue that accumulates in hibernating mammals, producing heat if the body becomes too cold.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lab tests showed that brown fat could help the body filter and remove branchedchain amino acids (BCAAs) from the blood.
Lab tests showed that brown fat could help the body filter and remove branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) from the blood.
Scientists from Rutgers and other institutes have uncovered how brown fat, or brown adipose tissue, is useful in fighting against obesity and diabetes.
A new study suggests that part of the answer may have to do with an ancient molecular shift in how DNA is packaged inside fat cells, which curbed our body's ability to turn 'bad' white fat into 'good' brown fat.
The study, published in the journal Scientific Reports, is one of the first to be carried out in humans to find components which could have a direct effect on 'brown fat' functions, which plays a key role in how quickly we can burn calories as energy.
Experts found that drinking a cup of coffee can stimulate "brown fat", which burns calories to generate body heat.
SCIENTISTS have discovered that drinking a cup of coffee can stimulate 'brown fat' - the body's own fat-fighting defences - which could be the key to tackling obesity and diabetes.
Professor Michael Symonds of Nottingham University, who codirected the study, said this was the first research to show how coffee has an impact on brown fat in humans.
A study by the School of Medicine at theUniversity of Nottingham,found that it does this by stimulating brown adipose tissue, also known as "brown fat" in your body, which burns calories to generate body heat.
A recent study has found that drinking a cup of coffee can stimulate 'brown fat', the body's own fat-fighting defences, which can fight against obesity and diabetes.
But infants (and many small mammals) have fat deposits that are made up of brown adipose tissue, or simply "brown fat." Unlike the white variety, brown fat has the capability of converting energy stored as fat into heat.
In a study led by Kristin Stanford of Ohio State University, Columbus, a lipid released from fat, or lipokine, produced by brown fat was shown to surge in the bloodstream after exercise.