bruised


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bruise

 (bro͞oz)
v. bruised, bruis·ing, bruis·es
v.tr.
1.
a. To injure the underlying soft tissue or bone of (part of the body) without breaking the skin, as by a blow.
b. To damage (plant tissue), as by abrasion or pressure: bruised the fruit by careless packing.
2. To dent or mar.
3. To pound (berries, for example) into fragments; crush.
4. To hurt, especially psychologically.
v.intr.
To experience or undergo bruising: Peaches bruise easily.
n.
1. An injury to underlying tissues or bone in which the skin is not broken, often characterized by ruptured blood vessels and discolorations.
2. A similar injury to plant tissue, often resulting in discoloration or spoilage.
3. A painful feeling caused by or associated with an experience.

[Middle English bruisen, from Old English brȳsan, to crush, and from Old North French bruisier (of Celtic origin).]

bruised

(bruːzd)
adj
injured in a way that causes discoloration to the skin
Translations

bruised

[ˈbruːzd] adjcontusionné(e)

bruised

adj
to be bruised (person)einen blauen Fleck/blaue Flecke haben; (= have severe bruising)Prellungen haben; (fruit, vegetable)eine Druckstelle/Druckstellen haben; she has a bruised shoulder, her shoulder is bruisedsie hat einen blauen Fleck/blaue Flecke auf der Schulter; I feel bruised all overmir tuts am ganzen Körper weh
(fig) ego, feelings, prideverletzt; to feel bruisedsich verletzt fühlen

bruised

adj con moretón, con moretones
References in classic literature ?
If I thus seem to cry out as one hurt, please remember that I have been sorely bruised and that I do dislike the thought that any son or daughter of mine or yours should be similarly bruised.
This struck the Unworthy Man on the head and set him rubbing that bruised organ vigorously with one hand while vainly attempting to expand an umbrella with the other.
Before long, however, Ginger was led in by two grooms, a good deal knocked about and bruised.
But in his hurry he overlooked a paving-stone in his way, stumbled, lost his centre of gravity, rolled over to a distance of some yards, and only rose again, bruised and begrimed, after the whole rabble of the Hague, with their muddy feet, had passed over him.
One would think that this was enough for one day, but Mynheer Boxtel did not seem to think so, as, in addition to having his clothes torn, his back bruised, and his hands scratched, he inflicted upon himself the further punishment of tearing out his hair by handfuls, as an offering to that goddess of envy who, as mythology teaches us, wears a head-dress of serpents.
Next come the legal effects, always supposing that the wronged party can summon heart enough to carry on a suit, with bruised affections--" "hang it," thought Tom, "why did I not think of that word 'bruised' while on my knees; it would tell like a stiletto--" "Yes, Miss Julia, if 'bruised affections' would permit the soul to descend to such preliminaries.
I know that I sprang forward, bent upon murder; I know that I was found in the gray of the morning, bruised and bloody, with finger marks upon my throat.
Then they were loaded off in some large city, and Michael continued on in greater quietness and comfort, although his injured foot still hurt and was bruised afresh whenever his crate was moved about in the car.
Maggie was not her pet child, and, in general, would have been much better if she had been quite different; yet the womanly heart, so bruised in its small personal desires, found a future to rest on in the life of this young thing, and the mother pleased herself with wearing out her own hands to save the hands that had so much more life in them.
It is a sad spectacle to see the weaklings bruised, exhausted, fluttering back to earth.
On examination she found the bruised flesh fearfully black and blue.
Sol Witberg would have bitten his bruised and swollen lip in chagrin, had it not hurt so much.