bruising

(redirected from bruisings)
Also found in: Thesaurus.

bruise

 (bro͞oz)
v. bruised, bruis·ing, bruis·es
v.tr.
1.
a. To injure the underlying soft tissue or bone of (part of the body) without breaking the skin, as by a blow.
b. To damage (plant tissue), as by abrasion or pressure: bruised the fruit by careless packing.
2. To dent or mar.
3. To pound (berries, for example) into fragments; crush.
4. To hurt, especially psychologically.
v.intr.
To experience or undergo bruising: Peaches bruise easily.
n.
1. An injury to underlying tissues or bone in which the skin is not broken, often characterized by ruptured blood vessels and discolorations.
2. A similar injury to plant tissue, often resulting in discoloration or spoilage.
3. A painful feeling caused by or associated with an experience.

[Middle English bruisen, from Old English brȳsan, to crush, and from Old North French bruisier (of Celtic origin).]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

bruising

(ˈbruːzɪŋ)
adj
1. (Pathology) causing bruises, as by a blow
2. aggressively antagonistic; hurtful: four months of bruising negotiation.
n
(Pathology) a bruise or bruises
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.bruising - causing mental or emotional injury; "a bruising experience"; "protected from the bruising facts of battle"- John Mason Brown
harmful - causing or capable of causing harm; "too much sun is harmful to the skin"; "harmful effects of smoking"
2.bruising - brutally forceful and compelling; "protected from the bruising facts of battle"
forceful - characterized by or full of force or strength (often but not necessarily physical); "a forceful speaker"; "a forceful personality"; "forceful measures"; "a forceful plan for peace"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

bruising

noun
1. discoloration, marking, swelling, contusion, ecchymosis She had quite a severe bruising and a cut lip.
adjective
1. hard, tough, violent, rough, fierce, ferocious, rumbustious a bruising battle over civil rights
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations

bruising

[ˈbruːzɪŋ] ADJ [experience] → doloroso, penoso; [match] → durísimo, violento
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

bruising

[ˈbruːzɪŋ]
adj
(= upsetting) [experience] → douloureux/euse
(= fierce) [battle, campaign, encounter] → éprouvant(e)
n (= bruises) → bleus mpl, contusions fpl
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

bruising

nPrellungen pl
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

bruising

[ˈbruːzɪŋ]
1. necchimosi f inv
2. adj (encounter, experience) → brutto/a; (criticism, defeat) → pesante
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
He had a permanent running wound on the outside of his right leg, originated by the constant bruisings of aristocratic carriage-poles during the many years that he had been in regular employ at the King's Arms, Casterbridge.
After bruising myself severely, much to the amusement of the Martians, I again had recourse to creeping, but this did not suit them and I was roughly jerked to my feet by a towering fellow who had laughed most heartily at my misfortunes.
Occasionally we would strike our heads against some projecting limb of a tree; and while imprudently engaged in rubbing the injured part, would fall sprawling amongst filthy fragments, cutting and bruising ourselves, whilst the unpitying waters flowed over our prostrate bodies.
During all this time the ship lay rolling in the trough of the sea, the heavy surges breaking over her, and the spars heaving and banging to and fro, bruising the half-drowned sailors that clung to the bowsprit and the stumps of the masts.
"I could believe all that," replied Sancho, "if my blanketing was the same sort of thing also; only it wasn't, but real and genuine; for I saw the landlord, Who is here to-day, holding one end of the blanket and jerking me up to the skies very neatly and smartly, and with as much laughter as strength; and when it comes to be a case of knowing people, I hold for my part, simple and sinner as I am, that there is no enchantment about it at all, but a great deal of bruising and bad luck."
As I expected, we found that the flesh underneath was terribly contused, for though the steel links had kept the weapons from entering, they had not prevented them from bruising. Both Sir Henry and Good were a mass of contusions, and I was by no means free.