brusque

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brusque

also brusk  (brŭsk)
adj.
Abrupt and curt in manner or speech; discourteously blunt. See Synonyms at gruff.

[French, lively, fierce, from Italian brusco, coarse, rough, from Late Latin brūscum, perhaps blend of Latin rūscus, butcher's broom, and Late Latin brūcus, heather; see briar1.]

brusque′ly adv.
brusque′ness n.

brusque

(bruːsk; brʊsk)
adj
blunt or curt in manner or speech
[C17: from French, from Italian brusco sour, rough, from Medieval Latin bruscus butcher's broom]
ˈbrusquely adv
ˈbrusqueness, brusquerie n

brusque

or brusk

(brʌsk; esp. Brit. brʊsk)

adj.
abrupt in manner; blunt; rough.
[1595–1605; < Middle French < Italian brusco rough, tart, special use of brusco (n.) butcher's broom < Late Latin brūscum, alter. of Latin rūscus, rūscum]
brusque′ly, adv.
brusque′ness, n.
syn: See blunt.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.brusque - marked by rude or peremptory shortness; "try to cultivate a less brusque manner"; "a curt reply"; "the salesgirl was very short with him"
discourteous - showing no courtesy; rude; "a distant and at times discourteous young"

brusque

brusque

also brusk
adjective
Rudely unceremonious:
Translations
جافٌّ، خَشِنٌ، فَظٌّ
příkrýprudký
bryskstuds
töykeä
durvanyers
stuttaralegur
grubusšiurkštumas
skarbsstrups
príkry

brusque

[bruːsk] ADJ (brusquer (compar) (brusquest (superl))) [comment, manner etc] → brusco, áspero; [person] → brusco
he was very brusque with meme trató con poca cortesía or con aspereza

brusque

[ˈbrʌsk ˈbruːsk ˈbrʊsk] adj
[person, manner] → brusque
[tone] → sec(sèche), cassant(e)

brusque

adj (+er) person, tone, mannerbrüsk, schroff; replyschroff

brusque

[bruːsk] adj (person, manner) → brusco/a; (tone) → secco/a

brusque

(brusk) , ((American) brask) adjective
blunt and abrupt in manner. a brusque reply.
ˈbrusquely adverb
ˈbrusqueness noun
References in classic literature ?
Dorothea looked straight before her, and spoke with cold brusquerie, very much with the air of a handsome boy, in amusing contrast with the solicitous amiability of her admirer.
Polina was not at all pleased at my questions; I could see that she was doing her best to irritate me with the brusquerie of her answers.
I hope you have not been so foolish as to take offence at any little brusquerie of mine; but no, that is improbable.