bruteness

bruteness

(ˈbruːtnəs)
n
the quality of being brutish or savage
References in classic literature ?
Through the bruteness and toughness of matter, a subtle spirit bends all things to its own will.
In the distance, a church cupola gleamed golden in the amber trees, and even the giant apartment blocks that dominated the far sky, like dingy quadruplets, seemed just symbols of something, not realities of the leaden bruteness of Soviet power.
(2) Leary, "Non-Naturalism and Normative Necessities." Many of the passages from Leary herein are offered in response to McPherson's charge that proposals like hers fall prey to "bruteness revenge," that they offer "an explanation of one necessary connection only by covertly relying on a second brute necessary connection" (McPherson, "Ethical Non-Naturalism and the Metaphysics of Supervenience," 222-23).
What Barfield calls the experience of a world of idols emptied of spiritual meaning Emerson describes in this same chapter as "the immobility or bruteness of nature" (48).
The immobility or bruteness of nature is the absence of spirit; to pure spirit it is fluid, it is volatile, it is obedient" (W 1.76).
Her preference for the term `feelings' reflects this commitment to mapping the ground between the bruteness of sensation and the socially shared terrain marked by the language of emotions.
The raw bruteness of the 'real' far exceeds the limiting logical structures of language.
However, the occurrence of mental events, as conceived by epiphenomenalism, might be one kind of example (and we are not, in any case, about to rehearse for barrenness analogues of the preceding considerations about bruteness.)(10) The striking point is rather as follows.