bruteness

bruteness

(ˈbruːtnəs)
n
the quality of being brutish or savage
References in classic literature ?
Through the bruteness and toughness of matter, a subtle spirit bends all things to its own will.
What Barfield calls the experience of a world of idols emptied of spiritual meaning Emerson describes in this same chapter as "the immobility or bruteness of nature" (48).
The immobility or bruteness of nature is the absence of spirit; to pure spirit it is fluid, it is volatile, it is obedient" (W 1.
Her preference for the term `feelings' reflects this commitment to mapping the ground between the bruteness of sensation and the socially shared terrain marked by the language of emotions.
The raw bruteness of the 'real' far exceeds the limiting logical structures of language.
However, the occurrence of mental events, as conceived by epiphenomenalism, might be one kind of example (and we are not, in any case, about to rehearse for barrenness analogues of the preceding considerations about bruteness.