bryophyte


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bry·o·phyte

 (brī′ə-fīt′)
n.
Any of numerous photosynthetic, chiefly terrestrial, nonvascular plants that reproduce by spores, including the mosses, liverworts, and hornworts. These three groups together formerly made up the division Bryophyta, which is now restricted to the mosses alone.

[New Latin Bryophyta, division name : bryo- + -phyte.]

bry′o·phyt′ic (-fĭt′ĭk) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

bryophyte

(ˈbraɪəˌfaɪt)
n
(Plants) any plant of the phyla Bryophyta (mosses), Hepatophyta (liverworts), or Anthocerophyta (hornworts), having stems and leaves but lacking true vascular tissue and roots and reproducing by spores
[C19: New Latin, from Greek bruon moss + -phyte]
bryophytic adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

bry•o•phyte

(ˈbraɪ əˌfaɪt)

n.
any of the Bryophyta, a phylum of nonvascular plants comprising the true mosses and liverworts.
[1875–80; < New Latin Bryophyta; see bryo-, -phyte]
bry`o•phyt′ic (-ˈfɪt ɪk) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

bry·o·phyte

(brī′ə-fīt′)
A member of a large group of seedless green plants that live on land and lack tissues (known as vascular tissues) that circulate water and dissolved nutrients. Bryophytes include the mosses and liverworts.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bryophyte - any of numerous plants of the division Bryophyta
Bryophyta, division Bryophyta - a division of nonflowering plants characterized by rhizoids rather than true roots and having little or no organized vascular tissue and showing alternation of generations between gamete-bearing forms and spore-bearing forms; comprises true mosses (Bryopsida) and liverworts (Hepaticopsida) and hornworts (Anthoceropsida)
moss - tiny leafy-stemmed flowerless plants
hepatic, liverwort - any of numerous small green nonvascular plants of the class Hepaticopsida growing in wet places and resembling green seaweeds or leafy mosses
nonvascular organism - organisms without vascular tissue: e.g. algae, lichens, fungi, mosses
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Abundance and diversity patterns of terrestrial bryophyte species in secondary and planted montane forests in the northern portion of the Central cordillera of Colombia.
Determinants of stream bryophyte community structure: bringing ecology into conservation.
However, the bryophyte extracts demonstrated inhibitory effect against both the gram positive and negative bacteria.
(Gigaspermaceae), new to the bryophyte flora of South America.
There are currently 557 individual species; one group of vascular plants (a group of six hawkweeds); two lichen communities and one bryophyte assemblage on the Welsh Government's list of 'priority biodiversity species'- section seven of the Environment (Wales) Act.
2002.- Bryophyte diversity, microhabitat differentiation, and distribution of life forms in Costa Rican upper montane Quercus forest.
Thus the studies reported by Sinclair and Gibson on bryophyte reproduction, and by Grey and Grey on a rare coral fungus, took place in the species' natural environment, whereas Woodford's paper, on the first use of camera traps, while essentially historical, discusses techniques that have become a regular part of field work.
Based on the calculated correlation matrices, as related to the samples taken from the six study stations, the obtained results indicate that there is a very significant high correlation between the bryophyte cover and the lichen cover on the phorophyte at the station 2 of Lake Tonga and station 1 of Lake Mellah, r = -1.000 ***, whereby, the more the first increases, the greater the decrease in the second and vice-versa, this observable regardless of the side of the forest sampled.
Most monographs deal either with bryophyte, lichen or algae vegetation.