buckish

buckish

(ˈbʌkɪʃ)
adj
dandyish; foppish
ˈbuckishly adv
References in periodicals archive ?
Disqualified for dancing his own non-regulation steps, the buckish Scott Hastings (Sam Lips) sets out to defy the sport's ruling federation and its rigid restrictions.
Buckish as executive vice president, Wealth Services for First Commonwealth Bank.
In this role, Buckish will oversee all aspects of the organisation's Wealth Management services, including trust, investments, brokerage and financial advisory.
Sometimes they may mount each other, and if a wether (castrate male) is kept with them, he may be a heat-detector and act buckish. The best solution is to obtain a buck rag, which is rubbed on the top of the head (See sidebar).
On New Year's Day 1924, he wrote to thank her for two Christmas presents," a lovely handkerchief which is very gay and buckish" and a portrait of herself, which he described as a "portrait of a lady resembling a lady of my acquaintance.
Women are all unfaithful or so our bitterest confirmed bachelor Don Alfonso would have his young buckish chums believe.
(41.) See, respectively [Francis Grose], 1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue: .,t Dictionary of Buckish Slang, University Wit, and Pickpocket Eloquence (London: Macmillan, 1981) n.pag.; and James T.
Harper also provided a complete list of sources he used, including An Etymological Dictionary of Modern English, the second edition of the Oxford English Dictionary, and the Dictionary of Buckish Slang, University Wit and Pickpocket Eloquence (available through Project Gutenberg at http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/5402).
Grose freely admits his indebtedness to a great variety of sources to produce the largest relevant compilation ever and also provides a link to the flourishing lexicography of nineteenth-century slang (it is a pity that Gotti did not consider Hewson Clarke's Lexicon Balatronicum, A Dictionary of Buckish Slang, University Wit, and Pickpocket Eloquence of 1811, which is based on Grose but "now considerably altered and enlarged, with the modern changes and improvements").
* 1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue (http://www.blackmask.com/books82c/dcvgr.htm), a reference to "buckish slang, university wit, and pickpocket eloquence"