buffaloberry


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buf·fa·lo·ber·ry

 (bŭf′ə-lō-bĕr′ē)
n.
1. Any of several North American shrubs or small trees of the genus Shepherdia, having silvery foliage, small yellowish flowers, and edible red or yellow fruit.
2. The berry of any of these plants.

buffaloberry

(ˈbʌfələʊˌbɛrɪ)
n
1. (Plants) any shrub of the genus Shepherdia native to North America
2. (Plants) the bitter tasting berry of such a shrub
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Common shrubs included willow (Salix spp.), chokecherry (Prunus virginiana), Saskatoon berry (Amelanchier alnifolia), red osier dogwood (Cornus stolonifera), and Canada buffaloberry (Shepherdia canadensis).
Buffaloberry occurrence in particular, along with that of a few other key food items, significantly predicts bear foraging activity (Nielsen et al.
For instance, we predicted feeding sites will have Mule Deer forage species such as Creeping Juniper (Juniperus horizontalis) and Chokecherry (Prunus virginianus), whereas bedding areas will contain other trees and shrubs such as Limber Pine (Pinus flexibilis) or Canada Buffaloberry (Shepherdia canadensis), which are not as important as forage species.
Clausen], Canada buffaloberry (Shepherdia canadensis (L.) Nutt.), New Jersey tea (Ceanothus americanus L.) and the native, leguminous shrub, leadplant (Amorpha canascens Pursh) (Table 1).
Bearberry (Arctostaphylos uva-ursi), wild rose (Rosa acicularis), and buffaloberry (Shepherdia canadensis) were the principal understory species of aspen stands and occurred in different proportions.
Eventually a 3x3 mule deer buck emerged from a patch of buffaloberry, stopping to look back over his shoulder at about 50 yards.
To answer this question we focused on three fruit species that cumulatively comprise a significant proportion of bear diets (Grenfell and Brody, 1983; Raine and Kansas, 1990; Richardson, 1991) prior to torpor in the Central Rocky Mountains: russet buffaloberry (Shepherdia canadensis), huckleberry (Vaccinium spp.), and Saskatoon serviceberry (Amelanchier alnifolia).
"Most label problems occurred in the past with the wild fruit wines, such as chokecherry or wild buffaloberry. We sell most of our wines right out of our tasting room.
Buffaloberry (Shepherdia spp.) Berries are edible but have a soapy taste.
For red or orange berries or other fruits, consider cotoneaster, crabapple, hawthorn, pyracantha, silver buffaloberry, and sumac.
As part of the ceremony, 400 traditional buffaloberry trees and 100 poplar trees were planted around the garden to serve as shelter for future crops.
They are Betula populifolia (gray birch), Carex scabrata, Corallorrhiza trifida (coral root), Gerardia pedicularia ambigens (clammy false foxglove), Hemicarpa drummondii, Hippuris vulgaris (mare's tail), Lechea stricta (bush pinweed), Lemna perpusilla (least duckweed), Linnaea borealis (twin flower), Lonicera canadensis (American fly honeysuckle), Oryzopsis pungens (short-horned rice grass), Panicum lucidum (bog panic grass), Psilocarya nitens (bald rush), Pyrola secunda (one-sided shinleaf), Scleria reticularis (netted nut rush), Shepherdia canadensis (russet buffaloberry), Trillium cernuum macranthum (nodding trillium), and Utricularia resu pinata (small purple bladderwort).