buffeting


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

buf·fet 1

 (bə-fā′, bo͞o-)
n.
1. A large sideboard with drawers and cupboards.
2.
a. A counter or table from which meals or refreshments are served.
b. A restaurant having such a counter.
3. A meal at which guests serve themselves from various dishes displayed on a table or sideboard.
adj.
Informally served: a buffet luncheon.

[French.]

buf·fet 2

 (bŭf′ĭt)
n.
A blow or cuff with or as if with the hand.
v. buf·fet·ed, buf·fet·ing, buf·fets
v.tr.
1. To hit or beat, especially repeatedly.
2. To strike against forcefully and especially repeatedly; batter: winds that buffeted the tent. See Synonyms at beat.
3. To cause repeated difficulty or harm to (a person or group): was buffeted about from job to job by the vagaries of the economy.
4. To force (one's way) with difficulty.
v.intr.
To force one's way with difficulty: a ship buffeting against the wind.

[Middle English, from Old French, diminutive of buffe, blow.]

buf′fet·er n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

buffeting

(ˈbʌfɪtɪŋ)
n
(Aeronautics) response of an aircraft structure to buffet, esp an irregular oscillation of the tail
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.buffeting - repeated heavy blowsbuffeting - repeated heavy blows      
blow, bump - an impact (as from a collision); "the bump threw him off the bicycle"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

buffeting

[ˈbʌfɪtɪŋ] N [of sea etc] → el golpear
to get a buffeting fromsufrir los golpes de
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

buffeting

[ˈbʌfɪtɪŋ] n
[wind, seas] → assaut m
(= attack) (on person)rebuffade f
to take a buffeting → essuyer une rebuffadebuffet lunch [ˌbʊfeɪˈlʌntʃ] nlunch-buffet m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

buffeting

nheftiges Schaukeln; (Aviat) → Rütteln nt; to get or take a buffetinghin und her geworfen or (Aviat) → gerüttelt werden
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

buffeting

[ˈbʌfɪtɪŋ]
1. n (of wind, waves) → violenza
the ship took a buffeting in the storm → la nave fu sballottata violentemente durante la tempesta
2. adj (wind) → violento/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
The buffeting winds caught and tossed it, and the girl laughed aloud in sheer joy of the resultant thrills.
At one time they must have been full of good old slow West Indiamen of the square-stern type, that took their captivity, one imagines, as stolidly as they had faced the buffeting of the waves with their blunt, honest bows, and disgorged sugar, rum, molasses, coffee, or logwood sedately with their own winch and tackle.
My first impressions of the gentle, dignified, and yet genial old man were entirely favourable: and the real satisfaction that showed itself on his daughter's face, as she met me with the words "this is indeed an unlooked-for pleasure!", was very soothing for whatever remains of personal vanity the failures and disappointments of many long years, and much buffeting with a rough world, had left in me.
Some ill-conditioned persons who sneer at the life-matrimonial, may perhaps suggest, in this place, that the good couple would be better likened to two principals in a sparring match, who, when fortune is low and backers scarce, will chivalrously set to, for the mere pleasure of the buffeting; and in one respect indeed this comparison would hold good; for, as the adventurous pair of the Fives' Court will afterwards send round a hat, and trust to the bounty of the lookers-on for the means of regaling themselves, so Mr Godfrey Nickleby and HIS partner, the honeymoon being over, looked out wistfully into the world, relying in no inconsiderable degree upon chance for the improvement of their means.