bugle


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bu·gle 1

 (byo͞o′gəl)
n.
1. Music A brass instrument somewhat shorter than a trumpet and lacking keys or valves.
2. The loud resonant call of an animal, especially a male elk during rutting season.
intr.v. bu·gled, bu·gling, bu·gles
1. Music To sound a bugle.
2. To produce a loud resonant call, as of a rutting male elk.

[Middle English, wild ox, hunting horn made from the horn of a wild ox, from Old French, steer, from Latin būculus, diminutive of bōs, ox; see gwou- in Indo-European roots.]

bu′gler n.

bu·gle 2

 (byo͞o′gəl)
n.
A tubular glass or plastic bead that is used to trim clothing.

[Origin unknown.]

bu·gle 3

 (byo͞o′gəl)
n.
Any of several creeping Old World herbs of the genus Ajuga in the mint family, having opposite leaves, square stems, and terminal spikes of purplish to white flowers. Also called bugleweed.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Late Latin būgula (perhaps influenced by būglōssa, bugloss), from Latin būgillō.]

bugle

(ˈbjuːɡəl)
n
(Instruments) music a brass instrument similar to the cornet but usually without valves: used for military fanfares, signal calls, etc
vb
(Music, other) (intr) to play or sound (on) a bugle
[C14: short for bugle horn ox horn (musical instrument), from Old French bugle, from Latin būculus young bullock, from bōs ox]
ˈbugler n

bugle

(ˈbjuːɡəl)
n
(Plants) any of several Eurasian plants of the genus Ajuga, esp A. reptans, having small blue or white flowers: family Lamiaceae (labiates). Also called: bugleweed See also ground pine
[C13: from Late Latin bugula, of uncertain origin]

bugle

(ˈbjuːɡəl)
n
(Crafts) a tubular glass or plastic bead sewn onto clothes for decoration
[C16: of unknown origin]

bu•gle1

(ˈbyu gəl)

n., v. -gled, -gling. n.
1. a brass wind instrument resembling a cornet but usu. without keys or valves, used typically for sounding military signals.
v.i.
2. to sound a bugle.
3. (of bull elks) to utter a rutting call.
[1250–1300; Middle English bugle (horn) instrument made of an ox horn < Anglo-French, Old French < Latin būculus bullock, young ox =bū- variant s. of bōs ox + -culus -cle1]
bu′gler, n.

bu•gle2

(ˈbyu gəl)

n.
any of various low-growing plants belonging to the genus Ajuga, of the mint family, usu. having blue flowers.
[1225–75; Middle English < Old French < Medieval Latin bugula a kind of plant]

bu•gle3

(ˈbyu gəl)

n.
Also called bu′gle bead`. a tubular glass bead used for ornamenting dresses.
[1570–80; of obscure orig.]

bugle

- Originally the word for ox, whose horn was used to give signals, it came to mean such a musical instrument.
See also related terms for horn.

bugle


Past participle: bugled
Gerund: bugling

Imperative
bugle
bugle
Present
I bugle
you bugle
he/she/it bugles
we bugle
you bugle
they bugle
Preterite
I bugled
you bugled
he/she/it bugled
we bugled
you bugled
they bugled
Present Continuous
I am bugling
you are bugling
he/she/it is bugling
we are bugling
you are bugling
they are bugling
Present Perfect
I have bugled
you have bugled
he/she/it has bugled
we have bugled
you have bugled
they have bugled
Past Continuous
I was bugling
you were bugling
he/she/it was bugling
we were bugling
you were bugling
they were bugling
Past Perfect
I had bugled
you had bugled
he/she/it had bugled
we had bugled
you had bugled
they had bugled
Future
I will bugle
you will bugle
he/she/it will bugle
we will bugle
you will bugle
they will bugle
Future Perfect
I will have bugled
you will have bugled
he/she/it will have bugled
we will have bugled
you will have bugled
they will have bugled
Future Continuous
I will be bugling
you will be bugling
he/she/it will be bugling
we will be bugling
you will be bugling
they will be bugling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been bugling
you have been bugling
he/she/it has been bugling
we have been bugling
you have been bugling
they have been bugling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been bugling
you will have been bugling
he/she/it will have been bugling
we will have been bugling
you will have been bugling
they will have been bugling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been bugling
you had been bugling
he/she/it had been bugling
we had been bugling
you had been bugling
they had been bugling
Conditional
I would bugle
you would bugle
he/she/it would bugle
we would bugle
you would bugle
they would bugle
Past Conditional
I would have bugled
you would have bugled
he/she/it would have bugled
we would have bugled
you would have bugled
they would have bugled
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bugle - a brass instrument without valvesbugle - a brass instrument without valves; used for military calls and fanfares
brass instrument, brass - a wind instrument that consists of a brass tube (usually of variable length) that is blown by means of a cup-shaped or funnel-shaped mouthpiece
2.bugle - any of various low-growing annual or perennial evergreen herbs native to Eurasia; used for ground cover
herb, herbaceous plant - a plant lacking a permanent woody stem; many are flowering garden plants or potherbs; some having medicinal properties; some are pests
Ajuga reptans, creeping bugle - low rhizomatous European carpeting plant having spikes of blue flowers; naturalized in parts of United States
Ajuga genevensis, blue bugle, erect bugle - upright rhizomatous perennial with bright blue flowers; southern Europe
Ajuga pyramidalis, pyramid bugle - European evergreen carpeting perennial
Ajuga chamaepitys, yellow bugle, ground pine - low-growing annual with yellow flowers dotted red; faintly aromatic of pine resin; Europe, British Isles and North Africa
3.bugle - a tubular glass or plastic bead sewn onto clothing for decoration
bead - a small ball with a hole through the middle
Verb1.bugle - play on a bugle
music - musical activity (singing or whistling etc.); "his music was his central interest"
spiel, play - replay (as a melody); "Play it again, Sam"; "She played the third movement very beautifully"
Translations
بوق
trubka
signalhorn
lúîur
シソラッパ
trimitastrimitininkas
taure
poľnica

bugle

[ˈbjuːgl] Ncorneta f, clarín m

bugle

[ˈbjuːgəl] nclairon m

bugle

nBügelhorn nt; bugle callHornsignal nt

bugle

[ˈbjuːgl] n (Mus) → tromba

bugle

(ˈbjuːgl) noun
a musical wind instrument usually made of brass, used chiefly for military signals. He plays the bugle.
ˈbugler noun
References in classic literature ?
There is something in a strain of music, whether produced by an instrument or by the human voice--take the sound of a bugle in a summer night, for instance--which by its wildness, to speak without satire, reminds me of the cries emitted by wild beasts in their native forests.
There was an exchange of bugle blasts; then a parley from the walls, where men-at-arms, in hauberk and morion, marched back and forth with halberd at shoulder under flapping banners with the rude figure of a dragon displayed upon them; and then the great gates were flung open, the drawbridge was lowered, and the head of the cavalcade swept forward under the frowning arches; and we, following, soon found ourselves in a great paved court, with towers and turrets stretching up into the blue air on all the four sides; and all about us the dismount was going on, and much greeting and ceremony, and running to and fro, and a gay display of moving and intermingling colors, and an altogether pleasant stir and noise and confusion.
A bugle note was heard, and a cluster of black specks was distinguishable against the snows of the upper heights.
No one guessed the quiet pleasure that lay hidden in her heart when she watched the girl's dark head bent over her lessons at night, nor dreamed of her joy it, certain quiet evenings when Miranda went to prayer meeting; evenings when Rebecca would read aloud Hiawatha or Barbara Frietchie, The Bugle Song, or The Brook.
In their fear, silence fell upon them, and a postillion, in the guise of a demon, passed in front of them, blowing, in lieu of a bugle, a huge hollow horn that gave out a horrible hoarse note.
But tarry ye behind in the borders of the forest, within earshot of my bugle call.
Without possessing the volume of classical bass voices, the tone of it was pleasing from a slightly muffled quality like that of an English bugle, which is firm and sweet, strong but velvety.
The quiet descendants of the Puritans were shocked by the uproar of military music; the drum, fife, and bugle drowning the holy organ peal and the voices of the singers.
The regiment rose to the blast of the bugle as one man; but one man there was who rose more swiftly than all the others, for half an inch of bayonet was in the fleshy part of his leg.
Here a strain of music stole in upon my monologue, and suspended it; it was a bugle, very skilfully played, in the neighbourhood of the park, I thought, or on the Place Royale.
went the driver's bugle at the dangerous places, and "yow
The Abbe Sicard sleeps here--the first great teacher of the deaf and dumb--a man whose heart went out to every unfortunate, and whose life was given to kindly offices in their service; and not far off, in repose and peace at last, lies Marshal Ney, whose stormy spirit knew no music like the bugle call to arms.