bulla

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bul·la

 (bo͝ol′ə)
n. pl. bul·lae (bo͝ol′ē)
1. A round seal affixed to a papal bull.
2. Medicine A large blister or vesicle.

[Medieval Latin, from Latin, bubble, seal.]

bul′lous adj.

bulla

(ˈbʊlə; ˈbʌlə)
n, pl -lae (-liː)
1. (Roman Catholic Church) a leaden seal affixed to a papal bull, having a representation of Saints Peter and Paul on one side and the name of the reigning pope on the other
2. (Antiques) an ancient Roman rounded metal or leather box containing an amulet, worn around the neck
3. (Pathology) pathol another word for blister1
4. (Anatomy) anatomy a rounded bony projection
[C19: from Latin: round object, bubble]

bul•la

(ˈbʊl ə, ˈbʌl ə)

n., pl. bul•lae (ˈbʊl i, ˈbʌl i)
1. a seal attached to an official document, as a papal bull.
2. a large blister or vesicle.
[1840–50; < Latin: bubble, also stud, boss, knob]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bulla - (pathology) an elevation of the skin filled with serous fluidbulla - (pathology) an elevation of the skin filled with serous fluid
vesicle, cyst - a small anatomically normal sac or bladderlike structure (especially one containing fluid)
pathology - the branch of medical science that studies the causes and nature and effects of diseases
water blister - blister containing a nonpurulent clear watery content
blood blister - blister containing blood or bloody serum usually caused by an injury
pustule - a small inflamed elevation of skin containing pus; a blister filled with pus
2.bulla - the round leaden seal affixed to a papal bull
seal, stamp - a device incised to make an impression; used to secure a closing or to authenticate documents
Translations

bul·la

n. ampolla.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bullae were small pieces of clay impressed by personal seals, used in ancient times to sign letters.
HUMAN PARVOVIRUS B19 can sometimes cause the appearance of multiple bullae alone, a pattern not typically seen with parvovirus B19 infections, reported Shoko Yoshii, MD, and his associates at the National Center for Child Health and Development in Tokyo in the Journal of Pediatrics.
It was among the 34 bullae found during Mazar's 2009 Ophel excavations, one of them belonging to Judean king Hezekiah, who ruled in the early seventh century B.C.
Examination of the patient's skin revealed diffuse edema and erythema of the bilateral great toes (FIGURE 1A), with large overlying bullae extending from the dorsal surface of the base of the great toes around to the plantar (volar) surface of the foot (FIGURE 1B).
A total of fifty cases presenting with an intact/ruptured vesicle or bullae at the time of presentation were selected on a random basis fulfilling the inclusion criteria.
Despite treatment with topical corticosteroids, the patient continued to manifest bullae and urticariforme plaques on his legs and trunk.
In dasypodids, the bullae are generally large and inflated, better developed than in any other group of xenarthrans (Roig; Segall, 1976; Patterson et al., 1989; Wible & Gaudin, 2004), condition that has been suggested as being an adaptation to life not only in underground niches but also in increased eremic conditions (Roig; Squarcia et al., 2007).
The children that are affected by epidermolysis bullosa are called Butterfly or Cotton wool babies because their skin is fragile.4 Recent classification depends on the level of tissue cleavage following trauma5, there are three major subtypes; EB simplex where cleavage is intraepidermal, it appears at birth with bullae formation limited to hands and feet that heal without scaring6, dystrophic EB where splitting is at sub lamina densa with bullae formation on feet, ankles, elbows and hands with absent or dystrophic nails and oral lesions that healed with scars, junctional EB the cleavage at lamina lucida , lesions appear at birth bullae and erosions formed which healed with scars on hands and feet with dystrophic nails and oral lesions.6
We present a diabetic patient with associated two diabetic dermatoses: diabetic dermopathy ("shin spots") and diabetic bullae. A 34-year-old man, with long history of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and moderate obesity presented to Dermatology Unit for diagnosis of his skin lesions.
Dermatological examination revealed multiple erythematous plaques with tense bullae on their surfaces over both forearms and neck (Figure 2).
Cutaneous examination showed bullae and vesicles on erythematous base as well as on normal skin all over the body, predominantly on forearms and lower limbs.