bulldog

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bull·dog

 (bo͝ol′dôg′, -dŏg′)
n.
1. A dog of a breed originally developed in England for bullbaiting, having a short stocky body, large head, and strong square jaws with dewlaps. Also called English bulldog.
2. A short-barreled, large-caliber revolver or pistol.
3. A heat-resistant material used to line puddling furnaces.
4. Chiefly British A proctor's assistant at Oxford University or Cambridge University.
adj.
Relentless or stubborn: "The Boston team has seldom before given such an exhibition of bulldog tenacity and fight" (Glenn Stout).
tr.v. bull·dogged, bull·dog·ging, bull·dogs Western US
To throw (a calf or steer) by seizing its horns and twisting its neck until the animal falls.

bull′dog′ger n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

bulldog

(ˈbʊlˌdɒɡ)
n
1. (Breeds) a sturdy thickset breed of dog with an undershot jaw, short nose, broad head, and a muscular body
2. (Education) (at Oxford University) an official who accompanies the proctors on ceremonial occasions
3. (Stock Exchange) commerce a fixed-interest bond issued in Britain by a foreign borrower
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

bull•dog

(ˈbʊlˌdɔg, -ˌdɒg)

n., adj., v. -dogged, -dog•ging. n.
1. one of an English breed of stocky, muscular shorthaired dogs having wide-set legs and a large head with prominent undershot jaws and a short, wrinkled muzzle, raised orig. for bullbaiting.
2. a stubbornly persistent person.
3. Brit. an assistant to the proctor of a university.
adj.
4. like or characteristic of a bulldog or of a bulldog's jaws.
v.t.
5. to attack in the manner of a bulldog.
6. Western U.S. to throw (a calf, steer, etc.) to the ground by seizing the horns and twisting the head.
[1490–1500]
bull′dog`ged•ness, n.
bull′dog`ger, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bulldog - a sturdy thickset short-haired breed with a large head and strong undershot lower jawbulldog - a sturdy thickset short-haired breed with a large head and strong undershot lower jaw; developed originally in England for bull baiting
working dog - any of several breeds of usually large powerful dogs bred to work as draft animals and guard and guide dogs
French bulldog - small stocky version of the bulldog having a sleek coat and square head
Verb1.bulldog - attack viciously and ferociously
assail, assault, set on, attack - attack someone physically or emotionally; "The mugger assaulted the woman"; "Nightmares assailed him regularly"
2.bulldog - throw a steer by seizing the horns and twisting the neck, as in a rodeo
surmount, master, overcome, subdue, get over - get on top of; deal with successfully; "He overcame his shyness"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
buldog
ブルドッグ
buldogas
buldog

bulldog

[ˈbʊldɒg]
A. Ndogo m, buldog m
B. CPD the bulldog breed Nlos ingleses (con su aspecto heroico y porfiado)
Bulldog > clip® Npinza f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

bulldog

[ˈbʊldɒg] nbouledogue mbulldog clip n (British)pince f à dessin
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

bulldog

n
Bulldogge f; he has the tenacity of a bulldoger hat eine zähe Ausdauer
(Brit, Univ) → Helfer mdes Proctors

bulldog

:
bulldog breed
n he is one of the bulldoger ist ein zäher Mensch
bulldog clip
n (Brit) → Papierklammer f
bulldog edition
nFrühausgabe f (einer Zeitung)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

bulldog

[ˈbʊlˌdɒg] nbulldog m inv
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
It seemed to her very odd that he should know as much about breeding bulldogs as any man in England; that he had a collection of wild flowers found near London; and his weekly visit to old Miss Trotter at Ealing, who was an authority upon the science of Heraldry, never failed to excite her laughter.
Ham- mering each other -- for we stepped aside and looked on while they rolled, and struggled, and gouged, and pounded, and bit, with the strict and wordless attention to business of so many bulldogs. We looked on with- out apprehension, for they were fast getting past ability to go for help against us, and the arena was far enough from the public road to be safe from intrusion.
They fought with more pertinacity than bulldogs. Neither manifested the least disposition to retreat.
It so happened that at that moment a Bulldog sat there sunning his teeth.
Sometimes, too, when he frightens me, it seems that he is a bulldog I have taken for a plaything, like some of the 'frat' girls, and he is tugging hard, and showing his teeth, and threatening to break loose."
This the younger man endeavoured to accomplish by clutching the bulldog's jaws in his hands and trying to spread them.
Before them the water shimmered, satin smooth and silver gray, and beyond, clean shaven William's Island loomed out of the mist, guarding the town like a sturdy bulldog. Its lighthouse beacon flared through the mist like a baleful star, and was answered by another in the far horizon.
Knocked forward on his face, he rolled over and grappled with Jerry, who slashed cheek- bone and cheek and ribboned an ear; for it is the way of an Irish terrier to bite repeatedly and quickly rather than to hold a bulldog grip.
Then the calf of his leg was badly lacerated and looked as though it had been mangled by a bulldog. Some sailor, he told me, had laid hold of it by his teeth, at the beginning of the fight, and hung on and been dragged to the top of the forecastle ladder, when he was kicked loose.
(in which they differ from the otter, whose ears are prominent), I noticed several varieties of seals about three yards long, with a white coat, bulldog heads, armed with teeth in both jaws, four incisors at the top and four at the bottom, and two large canine teeth in the shape of a fleur-de-lis.
He battled furiously but futilely--with the grim tenacity of a bulldog those awful fingers were clinging to his throat.
Its office helpers were all known to the "Army" by quaint titles--"Inky Ike," "the Bald-headed Man," "the Redheaded Girl," "the Bulldog," "the Office Goat," and "the One Hoss."