bullfinch

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bull·finch

 (bo͝ol′fĭnch′)
n.
1. A European bird (Pyrrhula pyrrhula) having a short thick bill and in the male a red breast, blue-gray back, and black head, wings, and tail.
2. Any of several similar finches.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

bullfinch

(ˈbʊlˌfɪntʃ)
n
1. (Animals) a common European finch, Pyrrhula pyrrhula: the male has a bright red throat and breast, black crown, wings, and tail, and a grey-and-white back
2. (Animals) any of various similar finches
[C14: see bull1, finch; probably so called from its stocky shape and thick neck]

bullfinch

(ˈbʊlˌfɪntʃ)
n
(Horse Training, Riding & Manège) Brit a high thick hedge too difficult for a horse and rider to jump
[C19: perhaps changed from the phrase bull fence]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

bull•finch

(ˈbʊlˌfɪntʃ)

n.
a Eurasian finch, Pyrrhula pyrrhula, the male of which has a black, white, and bluish-gray back with a rosy breast.
[1560–70; bull1 (perhaps in sense “bull-necked”) + finch]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Bullfinch - United States architect who designed the Capitol Building in Washington which served as a model for state capitols throughout the United States (1763-1844)
2.bullfinch - common European finch mostly black and white with red throat and breastbullfinch - common European finch mostly black and white with red throat and breast
finch - any of numerous small songbirds with short stout bills adapted for crushing seeds
genus Pyrrhula, Pyrrhula - bullfinches
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
hýl obecný
punatulkku
gil

bullfinch

[ˈbʊlfɪntʃ] Ncamachuelo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

bullfinch

[ˈbʊlfɪntʃ] nbouvreuil m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

bullfinch

[ˈbʊlˌfɪntʃ] nciuffolotto
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
I want you to whistle to my bullfinches; as I cannot see them I like to hear them, and we teach 'em airs that way.
"You'll find her so; she must be, to make you learn to whistle to her bullfinches. I am rather out of her books just now, but you will be quite in favour if you treat her live-stock well.
She soon found that whistling to the bullfinches in Mrs d'Urberville's room was no such onerous business when she had regained the art, for she had caught from her musical mother numerous airs that suited those songsters admirably.
Mrs d'Urberville slept in a large four-post bedstead hung with heavy damask curtains, and the bullfinches occupied the same apartment, where they flitted about freely at certain hours, and made little white spots on the furniture and upholstery.
"Species include willow tit, which is the fastest declining resident bird species in the UK as well as great crested grebes, herons, kestrels, bullfinches, nuthatches, A blue tit sparrows and starlings."
Furthermore, the garden provides a habitat for a tremendous range of bird life, from Jays and Bullfinches, to Kingfishers and Woodpeckers.
park many wildlife as adders, bullfinches As a Barry resident I am particularly concerned about the proposal to lease parts of Porthkerry Country Park for camping and an outdoor tourism activity, such as a high ropes facility.
The cover sports a stunning image of a pair of Bullfinches foraging through snow-decked brambles.
Other pests include bullfinches who love to pick off and eat dormant buds in winter, so you may need to net your tree if this is a problem.
p t bul and i Other pests include bullfinches who love to pick off eat dormant buds in winter, so you may need to net your tree if this is a problem.
Steve Oram, Orchard Biodiversity Officer at PTES, who led the project, said: "By producing local food and cider we can benefit woodpeckers, bullfinches and hundreds of other species associated with traditional orchards.