bullionism


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bullionism

the doctrine that paper money should at all times be convertible into bullion. — bullionist, n.
See also: Money
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Por su parte, las opiniones acerca de asuntos economicos relevantes dentro del imaginario de mercaderes y demas hombres de negocios, eran ante todo las legadas por los doctores escolasticos (por ejemplo, Tomas de Aquino) y las expuestas por los escritores partidarios del metalismo (bullionism).
The most rigorous criticism against bullionism appears in England's Treasure.
The only difference is that Mun uses it properly against bullionism, while Hume uses it incorrectly against mercantilism.
Although this is not an indication of crude bullionism (Pierre Vilar, "Primitivos espanoles"), it is one of the most salient features of all economic commentary of the early modern period.
(6) Los Stein utilizan la etiqueta "bullionism" --literalmente "lingotismo"-- definida como el control exhaustivo ejercido por la corona espanola de las extracciones minerales de oro y plata americanos desde la boca de la mina hasta el puerto de Sevilla y que produjo una contraccion permanente de la productividad industrial y agricola peninsular y americana (7-8).
(31) Pierre Vilar pointed out how the accusation of "bullionism" that used to be levelled against the scholastic doctors was unfounded.
Assembler era nanotechnology will create a new kind of bullionism. A central doctrine of mercantilism was that bullion could be stockpiled by creating the necessary economic and social conditions for promoting a positive balance of trade.
Assumed that economic relations were "zero sum" (my win is your loss!) Bullionism Belief that the economic health of a nation could be measured by stocks of precious metals like gold.
With this practice, called "bullionism", surpluses were not put to work for the common good, but rather were hoarded.
Munro, "Bullionism and the Bill of Exchange in England, 1272-1663: A Study in Monetary Management and Popular Prejudice." in The Dawn of Modern Banking, Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies (Berkeley, Calif., 1979), 169-215, esp.
This 'openness' in Tooke's bullionism was seen and appreciated by Ricardo, who, writing to James Mill in 1823, refers to Tooke as a potential ally: 'I hope Tooke is making great progress with his book--he is a very useful and able ally' (Ricardo to Mill, 14 January 1823; in Sraffa 1951-1973: vol.