bulrush

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bul·rush

 (bo͝ol′rŭsh′)
n.
1. Any of various aquatic or wetland sedges chiefly of the genus Scirpus, having grasslike leaves and usually clusters of small, often brown spikelets.
2. Any of several wetland plants of similar aspect, such as the papyrus and the cattail.

[Middle English bulrish : perhaps alteration (influenced by bule, bull) of bole, stem; see bole1 + rish, rush; see rush2.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

bulrush

(ˈbʊlˌrʌʃ)
n
1. (Plants) a grasslike cyperaceous marsh plant, Scirpus lacustris, used for making mats, chair seats, etc
2. (Plants) a popular name for reed mace1
3. (Bible) a biblical word for papyrus1
[C15 bulrish, bul- perhaps from bull1 + rish rush2, referring to the largeness of the plant; sense 2 derived from the famous painting by Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema (1836–1912), Dutch-born English painter, of the finding of the infant Moses in the "bulrushes" — actually reed mace]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

bul•rush

(ˈbʊlˌrʌʃ)

n.
2. any of various rushes of the genera Scirpus, of the sedge family, and Typha, of the cattail family.
[1400–50; late Middle English bulrish papyrus]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bulrush - tall marsh plant with cylindrical seed heads that explode when mature shedding large quantities of downbulrush - tall marsh plant with cylindrical seed heads that explode when mature shedding large quantities of down; its long flat leaves are used for making mats and chair seats; of North America, Europe, Asia and North Africa
cattail - tall erect herbs with sword-shaped leaves; cosmopolitan in fresh and salt marshes
2.bulrush - tall rush with soft erect or arching stems found in Eurasia, Australia, New Zealand, and common in North America
rush - grasslike plants growing in wet places and having cylindrical often hollow stems
genus Juncus, Juncus - type genus of the Juncaceae; perennial tufted glabrous marsh plants of temperate regions: rushes
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
الدّيس: عُشْبَةٌ مائِيَّه
rákos
skúfgras; sef
meldas
meldrs
hasır otusaz

bulrush

[ˈbʊlrʌʃ] Nespadaña f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

bulrush

nRohrkolben m; in the bulrushesim Schilfrohr
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

bulrush

[ˈbʊlˌrʌʃ] nstiancia
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

bulrush

(ˈbulraʃ) noun
a tall strong water plant.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
A teaboard, cups and saucers, plates, knives and forks (including carvers), spoons (various), saltcellars, a meek little muffin confined with the utmost precaution under a strong iron cover, Moses in the bullrushes typified by a soft bit of butter in a quantity of parsley, a pale loaf with a powdered head, two proof impressions of the bars of the kitchen fire-place on triangular bits of bread, and ultimately a fat family urn: which the waiter staggered in with, expressing in his countenance burden and suffering.
It was bowl-shaped and at the bottom, some hundreds of yards from where we lay, were pools of green-scummed, stagnant water, fringed with bullrushes. It was a weird place in itself, but its occupants made it seem like a scene from the Seven Circles of Dante.
J & J Cash woven silk picture of a grey heron fishing among the bullrushes of a pond and a Welsh cottage and the Principality's national flower.
a plant oil - possibly sesame oil;a "balsam-type" plant or root extract that may have come from bullrushes;a plant-based gum - a natural sugar that may have been extracted from acacia;crucially, a conifer tree resin, which was probably pine resin
As that reduces, so crofting is in decline, the bullrushes on crofting land and the moor returning to wilderness.
However, while British Gaumont's The Good Samaritan and Moses in the Bullrushes (both 1903) appear to have long since perished (Shepherd, 2014: 38), at least one other biblical film produced in Britain in the first decade of the twentieth century has been preserved for posterity: Arthur Melbourne Cooper's Noah's Ark (1909).
"It's a teal." "No, I've got the brochure here: Illustration 4b, mallard in flight over bullrushes."
pelt-swatters on their way to the Erie bullrushes at a lope.
A narrow twisting channel snakes through the salt marsh, among bullrushes and grey-green marram grass; long, incoming tides fill the creeks for people in little boats to row, to sail, to picnic and to fish.
Flooded trees, rock islands, bullrushes, water weeds, chicamba weed and a typically jagged and rocky shore line which will keep the avid angler busy for days.
I cast but got that machine gun feeling of baby bream attacking my hook so struck too fast, and my hook came flying out of the water and stuck in some nearby bullrushes just above the water's edge.