bullycide

bullycide

(ˈbʊlɪˌsaɪd)
n
(Psychiatry) the act or an instance of killing oneself intentionally as a result of bullying
[C21: from bully + (sui)cide]
References in periodicals archive ?
It's a sea of sadness when we read headlines of peer cruelty and youth dying as the word bullycide has now entered our vocabulary.
The settlement amount in Young's case is the same as that reached in a similar "bullycide" case, settled one month prior to the Young case, on March 1.
They also have an increased risk of suicidal thoughts and attempts, which has given rise to the term "bullycide"--a suicide caused by the effects of bullying.
In the "bullycide" context, despite a strong correlation between depression and suicide, the evidence linking bullying and suicide is inconclusive.
What Westerners might call bullycide the Japanese called "ijime-jisatsu", or suicide linked to bullying.
Shaw's presentation, Getting the Right Info to the Right People: Keys to Moving from Reaction Mode to Prevention Mode, will discuss how recent studies of widely publicized bullycide tragedies indicate educators often have the necessary information to avoid tragedy, but the challenge is getting that information into the hands of the right people.
Because depression and suicide ideation appear common among nine- to thirteen-year-olds victimized by bullying, (83) "bullycide" (84) and "cyberbullycide" (85) have become almost terms of art in educational circles following a rash of suicides in recent years.
For example, "Do you think bullycide (suicide as a means of escaping bullying) happens a lot?" and "Is a website like Through the Light ethical?" The author uses this additional material to spark discussion amongst readers about suicide, bullying, and depression.
These are typically preceding factors to a new term called bullycide. Bullycide refers to an individual who chooses to commit suicide as a result of being bullied.
The media has coined the term "bullycide" to describe the suicides of individuals who kill themselves following bullying.
She warned of increasing incidence of what she calls, bullycide. "Children used to be able to escape to their homes to protect themselves from being bullied at school, however, through cyber-bullying there is no escape which has resulted in many incidents of bullycide...