bullying

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bul·ly 1

 (bo͝ol′ē)
n. pl. bul·lies
1. A person who is habitually cruel or overbearing, especially to smaller or weaker people.
2. A hired ruffian; a thug.
3. A pimp.
4. Archaic A fine person.
5. Archaic A sweetheart.
v. bul·lied, bul·ly·ing, bul·lies
v.tr.
1. To treat in an overbearing or intimidating manner. See Synonyms at intimidate.
2. To make (one's way) aggressively.
v.intr.
1. To behave like a bully.
2. To force one's way aggressively or by intimidation: "They bully into line at the gas pump" (Martin Gottfried).
adj.
Excellent; splendid: did a bully job of persuading the members.
interj.
Used to express approval: Bully for you!

[Possibly from Middle Dutch boele, sweetheart, probably alteration of broeder, brother; see bhrāter- in Indo-European roots.]

bul·ly 2

 (bo͝ol′ē)
n.
Canned or pickled beef. Also called bully beef.

[Perhaps French bouilli, boiled meat, label on canned beef, from past participle of bouillir, to boil, from Old French boilir; see boil1.]

bullying

(ˈbʊlɪɪŋ)
n
the intimidation of weaker people
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bullying - the act of intimidating a weaker person to make them do somethingbullying - the act of intimidating a weaker person to make them do something
aggression - deliberately unfriendly behavior
frightening, terrorisation, terrorization - the act of inspiring with fear
Adj.1.bullying - noisily domineering; tending to browbeat others
domineering - tending to domineer
Translations

bullying

[ˈbʊlɪɪŋ]
A. ADJ [person] → matón, valentón; [attitude] → amedrentador, propio de matón
B. Nintimidación f, abuso m

bullying

[ˈbʊliɪŋ] nbrimades fplbullying tactics nmanœuvres fpl d'intimidation

bullying

adj person, mannertyrannisch; boss, wife alsoherrisch
nTyrannisieren nt, → Schikanieren nt; (with violence) → Drangsalieren nt; (= coercion)Anwendung fvon Druck (→ of auf +acc)

bullying

[ˈbʊlɪɪŋ]
1. nprepotenze fpl
2. adj (person, tone, behaviour) → prepotente

bullying

n acoso, intimidación f, hostigamiento
References in periodicals archive ?
WE EXPATS are forever complaining about Cypriot banks, conniving estate agents, the land registry, lawyers, politicians, the wilful slaughter of migrating birds, inhumane mistreatment of pets, the 'racist' or apathetic manner displayed toward us by government employees, local council taxes that specifically exploit us, the obstinate Orthodox Church monopoly to bury the dead not burn, this island's artfully corrupt kompari society that excludes us from 'arenas of power', bullyingly brutish taxi-drivers, strewn rubbish everywhere, Cypriot driving, parking ...the list is endless, but I must not forget to mention the turtles!
The economics that she rightly accuses of falling short in its efforts to explain the modern world--the economics that ignores human passions other than for the prudential pursuit of observable material gain and that bullyingly rejects as sissified any methods of inquiry other than those expressed in formal mathematics--is, although dominant, not the only species of economics.
It is perhaps because the cruelty of Never Let Me Go is so blandly observed by characters who are unwilling to challenge it that some reviewers have fretted so obsessively about whether it is "science fiction." Consider James Wood's not entirely backhanded compliment in The New Republic: "Given that Ishiguro's new novel is explicitly about cloning, that it is, in effect, a science fiction set in the present day, and that the odds against success in this mode are bullyingly stacked, his success in writing a novel that is at once speculative, experimental, and humanly moving is almost miraculous." Wood goes on to characterize as a "thin elite" those science fiction writers "who succeed on literary terms." H.G.