bumbling

(redirected from bumblingly)
Also found in: Thesaurus.

bum·ble 1

 (bŭm′bəl)
v. bum·bled, bum·bling, bum·bles
v.intr.
1. To speak in a faltering manner.
2. To move, act, or proceed clumsily. See Synonyms at blunder.
3. To make a buzzing sound.
v.tr.
1. To say (something) in a faltering manner.
2. To bungle; botch: bumble one's lines in a play.

[Perhaps blend of bungle and stumble.]

bum′bler n.

bum·ble 2

 (bŭm′bəl)
intr.v. bum·bled, bum·bling, bum·bles
To make a humming or droning sound; buzz.
n.
A humming or droning sound; a buzz.

[Middle English bomblen, of imitative origin.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.bumbling - lacking physical movement skills, especially with the hands; "a bumbling mechanic"; "a bungling performance"; "ham-handed governmental interference"; "could scarcely empty a scuttle of ashes, so handless was the poor creature"- Mary H. Vorse
maladroit - not adroit; "a maladroit movement of his hand caused the car to swerve"; "a maladroit translation"; "maladroit propaganda"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

bumbling

adjective clumsy, awkward, blundering, bungling, incompetent, inefficient, lumbering, inept, maladroit a clumsy, bumbling, inarticulate figure
able, fit, capable, efficient, competent, brisk
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

bumbling

adjective
Clumsily lacking in the ability to do or perform:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

bumbling

[ˈbʌmblɪŋ]
A. ADJ (= inept) → inepto, inútil; (= muttering) → que habla a tropezones
B. Ndivagación f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

bumbling

[ˈbʌmblɪŋ] adj [person] → empoté(e)
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

bumbling

adj (= clumsy)schusselig (inf); some bumbling idiotirgend so ein Vollidiot (inf)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
The motley cast of characters are played to the hilt by Rep's own homegrown performers: the hammy, pompous thespian Felix (Jeremy Domingo) and his secretive wife Madge (Christine Flores); up-and-coming actor Simon (Hans Eckstein) and his new bride, newbie actress Aggie (Mica Pineda); Gillette's protective if bumblingly lovable mother Martha (Jay Valencia Glorioso, with Joy Virata alternating); and the wild card, journalist-cum-medium Daria Chase (Pinky Amador).
Joe typifies Dickens's sense of sleep as an affair of farcical nontranscendence in which our higher faculties submit, bumblingly and bathetically, to the primitive needs of our bodies.
Unless, that is, I can somehow divert him from my own career path of bumblingly amateur attempts at historical research, public relations and journalism, and persuade him to become a funeral director instead.
bumblingly refers in his foreword (Alexandrov 169-70; Dawson 128-29; Appel 324).
He is incorrigibly slow and stupid about learning, but reads bumblingly in the testament, does multiplication sums on the slate and can write a letter after a fashion.
Not Wilsonian as in 1960s Prime Minister Harold Wilson, all searing intellect and cynical ruthlessness, but Wilsonian as in Dad's Army's bumblingly ineffectual Sergeant Wilson.
Rajcic's response to such criticism is typically clever and quick, such as her assertion that if she waited "until I really learned the language, so that I could be an author, my life would be long over." (32) Her German abilities are often undervalued, as Baumberger further points out: "Even though the author won the Chamisso Prize in 1994, today she is still sometimes presented as the writing guest worker, who bumblingly, brutishly, incorrectly polishes not only foreign floors, but also foreign words." (33) Such misappropriations of her work echo the "trugerisches Etikett" 'deceptive label' of her early success, when discovered as the female guest worker who writes poetry, she was heralded and shepherded as a rare commodity, a label that still looms over her work.