bunfight


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bunfight

(ˈbʌnˌfaɪt)
n
1. a tea party
2. ironic an official function
3. a petty squabble or argument
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bunfight - (Briticism) a grand formal party on an important occasion
jargon, lingo, patois, argot, vernacular, slang, cant - a characteristic language of a particular group (as among thieves); "they don't speak our lingo"
party - an occasion on which people can assemble for social interaction and entertainment; "he planned a party to celebrate Bastille Day"
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
References in periodicals archive ?
QUIBBLES: Bed-making was a bit of a bunfight as everyone tried to grab enough space for their family's sleeping bags.
Then in Cardiff a couple of days later, the one-off T20I against Pakistan served up a more familiar boundary-laden bunfight, sealed with aplomb - and a rare outbreak of emotion - by the skipper's unbeaten half-century, reported Cricinfo.
But I'm expecting a real bunfight for the two remaining top-four places.
After a site visit in the afternoon, chairman James Lay said: "We went down there and my first reaction was with the primary school across the road, picking up time at 3.30 was a real bunfight between children, parents and cars.
Conceived, designed and directed by Brett Bailey for South Africa's Third World Bunfight, with music adapted by Fabrizio Cassol from Verdi's Macbeth, the cast attacked the score with vigour and violence.
The atmosphere is always electric and last year centre manager Jonathan Hardy said: "It's a bit of a bunfight but very good-natured.
They would not join in the undignified bunfight that the referendum campaign has become and would not publicly support either side.
Both players did very well as Brighton were pushed back and while Blues had to leave plenty of gaps for Brighton to exploit, they actually dragged the league leaders into a bunfight.
In previous years United have stepped back and enjoyed not being part of the New Year bunfight but all the signs from the club are that they're willing to invest again to bolster a squad that has made a mixed start to life under Steve McClaren.
I also note that Cardiff Labour Group once again find themselves embroiled in another vicious bunfight. Wondering whether these two things might be related, is it not time for Cllr Bale to instruct his warring band to get out into their communities and fight for them?
This summer has been a 72-day bunfight about cigs, chicken soup and Helen hurling boringly repetitive X-rated insults.