bureaucratese

bu·reau·crat·ese

 (byo͝or′ə-kră-tēz′, -tēs′)
n.
A style of language characterized by the use of abstract nouns, jargon, and euphemism considered typical of bureaucrats.

bureaucratese

(ˌbjʊərəʊkræˈtiːz)
n
(Linguistics) informal derogatory wordy, jargon-filled, overcomplicated language considered typical of bureaucrats

bureaucratese

language characteristic of government bureaucracy, characterized by excessive use of jargon, convoluted construction, and periphrasis.
See also: Language Style
turgid, misleading language, as typical of bureaucracies. Cf. federalese, officialese.
See also: Bureaucracy
References in periodicals archive ?
The screenplay, credited to four accomplished writers, abounds in clichAaAaAeA@s and jargon that feel tired but probab reflect the bureaucratese of this sphere ('He's testing through the roof
They are casually mentioned in blank bureaucratese on the next to last page: "several hundred people.
There are provisions in the banking sector's Collective Labor Agreement for 2016/17 that banks have to ensure for their employees "the right of continuity of hospitalization coverage insurance" after retirement, through a program called in bureaucratese C onversion Privilege Options (CPO).
Translated from bureaucratese, the message was: hold on with the forces and restrictions you've got, regardless of how many American lives it costs.
border, the report highlights, in dry bureaucratese, the difficulty of stopping migrants from passing through Mexico as long as they continue to confront abject poverty and violence at home.
But that has not deterred the Government and the ministry from persevering with SIBs, or using bureaucratese to describe them.
The notice begins in inimitable bureaucratese (albeit available in six languages other than English):
The pitch-perfect mimicking of bureaucratese, the eerily reasonable logic of the measures, and the profile of a clutch of concerned citizens transformed into a cabal of the privileged make this story the best of the collection.
However, while Mohamad (2002:viii) sought 'recourse to the realm of images or to poetry and its ambiguities' in his fight 'against the acronym-studded columns of bureaucratese that made New Order Indonesia', Wardhana stretched the New Order language to its limits, thus showing its ridicule while simultaneously making it suitable for humorous, creative, and critical re-use.
But implementation has been slow and bogged down in bureaucratese.
Core concepts and key facts replace the jargon, acronyms, and bureaucratese that can thwart understanding.
these 17 SDGs 'are fairy tales, dressed in the bureaucratese of intergovernmental narcissism, adorned with the robes of multilateral paralysis, and poisoned by the acid of nation-state failure.