bureaucratese

bu·reau·crat·ese

 (byo͝or′ə-kră-tēz′, -tēs′)
n.
A style of language characterized by the use of abstract nouns, jargon, and euphemism considered typical of bureaucrats.

bureaucratese

(ˌbjʊərəʊkræˈtiːz)
n
(Linguistics) informal derogatory wordy, jargon-filled, overcomplicated language considered typical of bureaucrats

bureaucratese

language characteristic of government bureaucracy, characterized by excessive use of jargon, convoluted construction, and periphrasis.
See also: Language Style
turgid, misleading language, as typical of bureaucracies. Cf. federalese, officialese.
See also: Bureaucracy
References in periodicals archive ?
One of the features of the world of Oceania reflecting Orwell's prescience is its official language, Newspeak, an argot resembling a kind of Morse code that satirizes advertising norms, political jargon, and government bureaucratese. The purpose of Newspeak is to limit thought, on the view that "you can't think what you lack the words for." Ultimately, this impoverished language seeks to narrow and control human thought.
Barr, at the request of the Department of Homeland Security, delayed the effective date of his new rule for 90 days "so that DHS may conduct necessary operational planning." That's bureaucratese for saying there's no room in the existing detention system and the government needs time to add more internment camps.
But when I hear students heckling a college president as he pleads with them, or watch a 20-year-old shrieking at a professor on the quad, and listen to deans respond with tepid bureaucratese, the authors' analyses come off as insufficient.
No matter how arcane, obfuscated in bureaucratese, or technically obscure, each 900-page report must be reviewed, hundreds of iterations of highly technical correspondence fossicked through and omissions, the disregarded or avoided detail, must also be noted.
Choose clear, concise language to communicate, not bureaucratese to impress and confound.
When originally mooted in 1910, the sonorously phrased Plantation Establishment Livelihood Improvement Scheme (Pelis) mdash a mouthful of bureaucratese for the shamba system mdash was noble in intention.
"The screenplay, credited to four accomplished writers, abounds in clichAaAaAeA@s and jargon that feel tired but probab reflect the bureaucratese of this sphere ('He's testing through the roof!')," (http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/review/american-assassin-review-1034978) the Hollywood Reporter's Sheri Linden noted.
They are casually mentioned in blank bureaucratese on the next to last page: "several hundred people...were caught buying, selling, and working on the Silk Road and were subsequently arrested." But we don't meet them, don't learn how upset their friends or parents are, aren't asked to wonder what good in the world is lost because they are locked up.
There are provisions in the banking sector's Collective Labor Agreement for 2016/17 that banks have to ensure for their employees "the right of continuity of hospitalization coverage insurance" after retirement, through a program called in bureaucratese C onversion Privilege Options (CPO).
if we must withdraw from Korea, it [must] be clear to the world that that course is forced upon us by military necessity." Translated from bureaucratese, the message was: hold on with the forces and restrictions you've got, regardless of how many American lives it costs.
(288) To translate from bureaucratese, the BIA is saying that descent is another proxy for connections to a political entity, specifically a tribe, which existed historically.
border, the report highlights, in dry bureaucratese, the difficulty of stopping migrants from passing through Mexico as long as they continue to confront abject poverty and violence at home.