burgess


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bur·gess

 (bûr′jĭs)
n.
1. A freeman or citizen of an English borough.
2. A member of the English Parliament who once represented a town, borough, or university.
3. A member of the lower house of the legislature of colonial Virginia or Maryland.

[Middle English burgeis, from Old French, from Late Latin burgēnsis, from burgus, fortified town; see bhergh- in Indo-European roots.]

burgess

(ˈbɜːdʒɪs)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (in England)
a. a citizen or freeman of a borough
b. any inhabitant of a borough
2. (Historical Terms) English history a Member of Parliament from a borough, corporate town, or university
3. (Historical Terms) a member of the colonial assembly of Maryland or Virginia
[C13: from Old French burgeis, from borc town, from Late Latin burgus, of Germanic origin; see borough]

Burgess

(ˈbɜːdʒɪs)
n
1. (Biography) Anthony, real name John Burgess Wilson. 1917–93, English novelist and critic: his novels include A Clockwork Orange (1962), Tremor of Intent (1966), Earthly Powers (1980), and Any Old Iron (1989)
2. (Biography) Guy. 1911–63, British spy, who fled to the Soviet Union (with Donald Maclean) in 1951

bur•gess

(ˈbɜr dʒɪs)

n.
1. a representative in the House of Burgesses.
2. (formerly) a representative of a borough, corporate town, or university in the British Parliament.
[1175–1225; Middle English burgeis < Anglo-French, Old French, =burg city (< Germanic) + -eis < Latin -ēnsis -ensis; compare -ese]

Bur•gess

(ˈbɜr dʒɪs)

n.
1. (Frank) Gelett, 1866–1951, U.S. illustrator and humorist.
2. Thornton Waldo, 1874–1965, U.S. author.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Burgess - English writer of satirical novels (1917-1993)
2.burgess - a citizen of an English borough
Englishman - a man who is a native or inhabitant of England
Translations

burgess

[ˈbɜːdʒɪs] N (Brit) → ciudadano/a m/f (archaic) (Parl) → diputado/a m/f

burgess

n
(freier) Bürger, (freie) Bürgerin
(Hist) → Abgeordnete(r) mf
(US) Abgeordneter der Volksvertretung der Kolonien Maryland oder Virginia
References in classic literature ?
If you are a burgess of the gardens (which have a vocabulary of their own), the faces of these quaint mothers are a clock to you, in which you may read the ages of their young.
Burgess, in hopes, as I tell her, to fall in with the Doctor again.
Why, he is no more than a ponderous bromide, thanks to Gelett Burgess. And Praps is no better.
I've heard that Burgess himself he made the models fer three or four of 'em, Dad's sot ag'in' 'em on account o' their pitchin' an' joltin', but there's heaps o' money in 'em.
There are rogues and knaves here, friars and priests, barons and burgesses, bakers and butchers, tailors and tanners, masons and miners, and folk of many other crafts.
The sloping galleries were crowded with all that was noble, great, wealthy, and beautiful in the northern and midland parts of England; and the contrast of the various dresses of these dignified spectators, rendered the view as gay as it was rich, while the interior and lower space, filled with the substantial burgesses and yeomen of merry England, formed, in their more plain attire, a dark fringe, or border, around this circle of brilliant embroidery, relieving, and, at the same time, setting off its splendour.
In Lincoln's Inn, they gave up the hall and commons to the Northumberland Militia, under the command of Lord Algernon Percy; in some few of the city wards, the burgesses turned out, and without making a very fierce show, looked brave enough.
From these burgesses the first elements of the bourgeoisie were developed.
Mawmsey, a chief representative in Middlemarch of that great social power, the retail trader, and naturally one of the most doubtful voters in the borough--willing for his own part to supply an equal quality of teas and sugars to reformer and anti-reformer, as well as to agree impartially with both, and feeling like the burgesses of old that this necessity of electing members was a great burthen to a town; for even if there were no danger in holding out hopes to all parties beforehand, there would be the painful necessity at last of disappointing respectable people whose names were on his books.
"They look just like the tiles at Parkland Hospital, where I did my residency," Burgess said, smiling.
It's hard to mine even a grain of hope from the darkness of a little boy's death, but Calandra Burgess is trying.
Kyle Smith, pictured, smiled as he walked away from the "lifeless" body of Stuart Burgess, Birmingham Crown Court heard.