burgher


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burgher

citizen of a town or borough
Not to be confused with:
burger – hamburger

burgh·er

 (bûr′gər)
n.
1. A citizen of a town or borough.
2. A comfortable or complacent member of the middle class.
3.
a. A member of the mercantile class of a medieval European city.
b. A citizen of a medieval European city.

[German Bürger or Dutch burger, both from Middle High German burgaere, from Old High German burgārī, from burg, city; see bhergh- in Indo-European roots.]

burgher

(ˈbɜːɡə)
n
1. (Historical Terms) a member of the trading or mercantile class of a medieval city
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a respectable citizen; bourgeois
3. (Historical Terms) archaic a citizen or inhabitant of a corporate town, esp on the Continent
4. (Historical Terms) history
a. a citizen of the Cape Colony or of one of the Transvaal and Free State republics
b. (as modifier): burgher troops.
[C16: from German Bürger, or Dutch burger freeman of a borough]

burgh•er

(ˈbɜr gər)

n.
an inhabitant of a town or borough, esp. a well-to-do member of the middle class.
[1560–70; < Middle Dutch < Middle High German burger=burg borough + -er -er1]
burgh′er•ship`, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.burgher - a citizen of an English borough
Englishman - a man who is a native or inhabitant of England
2.burgher - a member of the middle class
bourgeoisie, middle class - the social class between the lower and upper classes
common man, common person, commoner - a person who holds no title
petit bourgeois - a member of the lower middle class
Translations

burgher

[ˈbɜːgəʳ] N (archaic or liter) (= bourgeois) → burgués/esa m/f; (= citizen) → ciudadano/a m/f

burgher

[ˈbɜːrr] n (old-fashioned)citoyen(ne) m/f

burgher

n (old)Bürger(in) m(f)

burgher

[ˈbɜːgəʳ] ncittadino/a
References in classic literature ?
This troop, the only defence of the prison, overawed by its firm attitude not only the disorderly riotous mass of the populace, but also the detachment of the burgher guard, which, being placed opposite the Buytenhof to support the soldiers in keeping order, gave to the rioters the example of seditious cries, shouting, --
To speak plainly, the fellow had, in spite of his grinning, an audacious and sinister kind of face; and as he curvetted right into the village, the old stumpy appearance of his pumps excited no little suspicion; and many a burgher who beheld him that day would have given a trifle for a peep beneath the white cambric handkerchief which hung so obtrusively from the pocket of his swallow-tailed coat.
It is such things as these That knit a state together, when a Prince So nobly born and of such fair address, Forgetting unjust Fortune's differences, Comes to an honest burgher's honest home As a most honest friend.
Rostopchin's broadsheets, headed by woodcuts of a drink shop, a potman, and a Moscow burgher called Karpushka Chigirin, "who- having been a militiaman and having had rather too much at the pub- heard that Napoleon wished to come to Moscow, grew angry, abused the French in very bad language, came out of the drink shop, and, under the sign of the eagle, began to address the assembled people," were read and discussed, together with the latest of Vasili Lvovich Pushkin's bouts rimes.
But now all the benches were filled with guests, lord and lady, burgher and dame, when at last the Sheriff himself came with his lady, he riding with stately mien upon his milk-white horse and she upon her brown filly.
CREON Burghers, my noble friends, ye take alarm At my approach (I read it in your eyes), Fear nothing and refrain from angry words.
--Gayer sallies, more merry mirth, better jokes, and brighter repartees, you never heard over your mahogany, than you will hear over the half-inch white cedar of the whale-boat, when thus hung in hangman's nooses; and, like the six burghers of Calais before King Edward, the six men composing the crew pull into the jaws of death, with a halter around every neck, as you may say.
The prince's court, too, with its swarm of noble barons and wealthy knights, many of whom, in imitation of their master, had brought their ladies and their children from England, all helped to swell the coffers of the burghers. Now, with this fresh influx of noblemen and cavaliers, food and lodging were scarce to be had, and the prince was hurrying forward his forces to Dax in Gascony to relieve the overcrowding of his capital.
The room had some resemblance to the clay-floored halls in Holstein; a pretty numerous company, consisting of seamen, Copenhagen burghers, and a few scholars, sat here in deep converse over their pewter cans, and gave little heed to the person who entered.
The green lea was speckled as thickly with them as a canvas by Van Alsloot or Sallaert with burghers. The ripe hue of the red and dun kine absorbed the evening sunlight, which the white-coated animals returned to the eye in rays almost dazzling, even at the distant elevation on which she stood.
So vicious was his onslaught that the poorly armed and unprotected burghers, unused to the stern game of war, fell like sheep before the iron men on their iron shod horses.
From the serfs of the Middle Ages sprang the chartered burghers of the earliest towns.