burglar


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Related to burglar: burglar alarm

bur·glar

 (bûr′glər)
n.
One who commits burglary.

[Anglo-Norman burgler (alteration of burgesur, probably from Old French burg, borough) and Medieval Latin burgulātor (alteration of burgātor, from burgāre, to commit burglary in, from Late Latin burgus, fortified town), both of Germanic origin; see bhergh- in Indo-European roots.]

burglar

(ˈbɜːɡlə)
n
(Professions) a person who commits burglary; housebreaker
[C15: from Anglo-French burgler, from Medieval Latin burglātor, probably from burgāre to thieve, from Latin burgus castle, fortress, of Germanic origin]

bur•glar

(ˈbɜr glər)

n.
a person who commits burglary.
[1535–45; < Anglo-French burgler (compare Anglo-Latin burg(u)lātor), of obscure orig.; see -ar2]

thief

robberburglar

Anyone that steals can be called a thief. A robber often uses violence or the threat of violence to steal things from places such as banks or shops.

They caught the armed robber who raided a supermarket.

A burglar breaks into houses or other buildings and steals things.

The average burglar spends just two minutes inside your house.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.burglar - a thief who enters a building with intent to stealburglar - a thief who enters a building with intent to steal
cat burglar, housebreaker - a burglar who unlawfully breaks into and enters another person's house
stealer, thief - a criminal who takes property belonging to someone else with the intention of keeping it or selling it

burglar

noun housebreaker, thief, robber, pilferer, filcher, cat burglar, sneak thief, picklock burglars broke into their home

burglar

noun
Translations
لَصّ الـمَنازِللِصُّ المنازِلِ لَيْلا
lupič
indbrudstyvtyv
murtovaras
provalnik
innbrotsòjófur
不法侵入者
강도
įsilaužėlisįsilaužimassignalizacija
kramplauzis
vlomilec
inbrottstjuv
ขโมย
ev soyan hırsızhırsız
kẻ trộm

burglar

[ˈbɜːgləʳ]
A. Nladrón/ona m/f
B. CPD burglar alarm Nalarma f antirrobo

burglar

[ˈbɜːrglər] ncambrioleur/euse m/fburglar alarm n(système m d') alarme f

burglar

nEinbrecher(in) m(f)

burglar

[ˈbɜːgləʳ] nladro/a, scassinatore/trice

burglar

(ˈbəːglə) noun
a person who enters a house etc illegally to steal. The burglar stole her jewellery.
ˈburglar alarm noun
an alarm against burglaries.
ˈburglaryplural ˈburglaries noun
(an act of) illegally entering a house etc to steal. He has been charged with burglary.
ˈburgle verb
Our house has been burgled.

burglar

لَصّ الـمَنازِل lupič tyv Einbrecher διαρρήκτης ladrón murtovaras cambrioleur provalnik scassinatore 不法侵入者 강도 inbreker innbruddstyv włamywacz assaltante взломщик inbrottstjuv ขโมย hırsız kẻ trộm 夜贼
References in classic literature ?
This answer deeply impressed the Lawyer, and having ascertained that the Burglar had accumulated no money in his profession he threw up the case.
A SENATOR fell to musing as follows: "With the money which I shall get for my vote in favour of the bill to subsidise cat-ranches, I can buy a kit of burglar's tools and open a bank.
"There's a man on board we want--a Philadelphia burglar called 'Pinky' McGuire.
"It's lucky you didn't turn your artillery on him or you might have given him quite a bad cold." Then, after a bewildered pause, he said: "Was it a burglar?"
But one night, under cover of darkness, and further concealed in a most cunning disguisement, a desperate burglar slid into his happy home, and robbed them all of everything.
Then he carefully scrutinized the broken and frayed end where it had snapped off when the burglar had dragged it down.
Hesiod's diction is in the main Homeric, but one of his charms is the use of quaint allusive phrases derived, perhaps, from a pre- Hesiodic peasant poetry: thus the season when Boreas blows is the time when `the Boneless One gnaws his foot by his fireless hearth in his cheerless house'; to cut one's nails is `to sever the withered from the quick upon that which has five branches'; similarly the burglar is the `day-sleeper', and the serpent is the `hairless one'.
It was no common burglar's work, for what had I worth stealing?
"Your last remark," said Holmes, presently, "as to the possibility of there being an understanding between the burglar and the servant, and this being a note of appointment from one to the other, is an ingenious and not entirely impossible supposition.
In that case I was resolved to tell him that Raffles and I had made a bet about his burglar trap, and that I had come to see who had won.
"I never met a burglar before," she assured him, "and I can't begin to tell you how interested I am."
A man isn't necessarily a burglar because he wears a decent suit of clothes.'