burglar

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Related to burglars: cat burglars

bur·glar

 (bûr′glər)
n.
One who commits burglary.

[Anglo-Norman burgler (alteration of burgesur, probably from Old French burg, borough) and Medieval Latin burgulātor (alteration of burgātor, from burgāre, to commit burglary in, from Late Latin burgus, fortified town), both of Germanic origin; see bhergh- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

burglar

(ˈbɜːɡlə)
n
(Professions) a person who commits burglary; housebreaker
[C15: from Anglo-French burgler, from Medieval Latin burglātor, probably from burgāre to thieve, from Latin burgus castle, fortress, of Germanic origin]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

bur•glar

(ˈbɜr glər)

n.
a person who commits burglary.
[1535–45; < Anglo-French burgler (compare Anglo-Latin burg(u)lātor), of obscure orig.; see -ar2]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

thief

robberburglar

Anyone that steals can be called a thief. A robber often uses violence or the threat of violence to steal things from places such as banks or shops.

They caught the armed robber who raided a supermarket.

A burglar breaks into houses or other buildings and steals things.

The average burglar spends just two minutes inside your house.
Collins COBUILD English Usage © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 2004, 2011, 2012
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.burglar - a thief who enters a building with intent to stealburglar - a thief who enters a building with intent to steal
cat burglar, housebreaker - a burglar who unlawfully breaks into and enters another person's house
stealer, thief - a criminal who takes property belonging to someone else with the intention of keeping it or selling it
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

burglar

noun housebreaker, thief, robber, pilferer, filcher, cat burglar, sneak thief, picklock burglars broke into their home
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

burglar

noun
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
لَصّ الـمَنازِللِصُّ المنازِلِ لَيْلا
lupič
indbrudstyvtyv
murtovaras
provalnik
innbrotsòjófur
不法侵入者
강도
įsilaužėlisįsilaužimassignalizacija
kramplauzis
vlomilec
inbrottstjuv
ขโมย
ev soyan hırsızhırsız
kẻ trộm

burglar

[ˈbɜːgləʳ]
A. Nladrón/ona m/f
B. CPD burglar alarm Nalarma f antirrobo
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

burglar

[ˈbɜːrglər] ncambrioleur/euse m/fburglar alarm n(système m d') alarme f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

burglar

nEinbrecher(in) m(f)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

burglar

[ˈbɜːgləʳ] nladro/a, scassinatore/trice
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

burglar

(ˈbəːglə) noun
a person who enters a house etc illegally to steal. The burglar stole her jewellery.
ˈburglar alarm noun
an alarm against burglaries.
ˈburglaryplural ˈburglaries noun
(an act of) illegally entering a house etc to steal. He has been charged with burglary.
ˈburgle verb
Our house has been burgled.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

burglar

لَصّ الـمَنازِل lupič tyv Einbrecher διαρρήκτης ladrón murtovaras cambrioleur provalnik scassinatore 不法侵入者 강도 inbreker innbruddstyv włamywacz assaltante взломщик inbrottstjuv ขโมย hırsız kẻ trộm 夜贼
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in classic literature ?
The Cardiff Hill episode sank into instant in- significance, the burglars were forgotten, horses were saddled, skiffs were manned, the ferryboat ordered out, and before the horror was half an hour old, two hundred men were pouring down highroad and river toward the cave.
He rushed at the burglars, but another--it was an elderly man--stooped, picked the poker out of the grate and struck him a horrible blow as he passed.
A gang of burglars acting in the country might be expected to vary the scene of their operations, and not to crack two cribs in the same district within a few days.
I still remember waiting with bated breath for Raffles to ask Maguire if he were not afraid of burglars, and Maguire replying that he had a trap to catch the cleverest cracksman alive, but flatly refusing to tell us what it was.
I should like to give you something to eat--women always prepare midnight suppers for the burglars they catch, at least they do in the magazine stories.
"Well, then, there are burglars in the neighborhood."
A moderate-sized safe stood in his bedroom, constructed so as to defy fire as well as burglars; but Passepartout found neither arms nor hunting weapons anywhere; everything betrayed the most tranquil and peaceable habits.
Dudley was so eloquent about burglars that he almost had me going.
Moreover, he was afraid of his wife, afraid of a policeman, afraid of physical violence, and lived in constant dread of burglars. But the one thing he was not afraid of was wild animals of the most ferocious sorts, such as lions, tigers, leopards, and jaguars.
For example, they are the thieves, burglars, cutpurses, footpads, robbers of temples, man-stealers of the community; or if they are able to speak they turn informers, and bear false witness, and take bribes.
Hesiod's diction is in the main Homeric, but one of his charms is the use of quaint allusive phrases derived, perhaps, from a pre- Hesiodic peasant poetry: thus the season when Boreas blows is the time when `the Boneless One gnaws his foot by his fireless hearth in his cheerless house'; to cut one's nails is `to sever the withered from the quick upon that which has five branches'; similarly the burglar is the `day-sleeper', and the serpent is the `hairless one'.
It was no common burglar's work, for what had I worth stealing?