burke


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burke

 (bûrk)
tr.v. burked, burk·ing, burkes
1. To suppress or extinguish quietly; stifle: burked the investigation by failing to reappoint the commission.
2. To avoid; disregard: "To make The Tempest a tragic and depressing play he was willing to burke all the elements that made it the exact opposite" (Robert M. Adams).
3. To execute (someone) by suffocation so as to leave the body intact and suitable for dissection.

[After William Burke (1792-1829), Irish-born grave robber and murderer.]

Burke

(bɜːk)
n
1. (Biography) Edmund. 1729–97, British Whig statesman, conservative political theorist, and orator, born in Ireland: defended parliamentary government and campaigned for a more liberal treatment of the American colonies; denounced the French Revolution
2. (Biography) Robert O'Hara. 1820–61, Irish explorer, who led the first expedition (1860–61) across Australia from south to north. He was accompanied by W. J. Wills, George Grey, and John King; King alone survived the return journey
3. (Biography) William. 1792–1829, Irish murderer and body snatcher; associate of William Hare

burke

(bɜːk)
vb (tr)
1. (Law) to murder in such a way as to leave no marks on the body, usually by suffocation
2. to get rid of, silence, or suppress
[C19: named after William Burke, executed in Edinburgh for a murder of this type]

burke

(bɜrk)

v.t. burked, burk•ing.
1. to murder by suffocation, so as to leave no marks of violence.
2. to suppress or get rid of quietly or indirectly.
[1840–45; after William Burke, hanged in 1829 in Edinburgh for murders of this kind]

Burke

(bɜrk)

n.
Edmund, 1729–97, Irish statesman, orator, and writer.

burke


Past participle: burked
Gerund: burking

Imperative
burke
burke
Present
I burke
you burke
he/she/it burkes
we burke
you burke
they burke
Preterite
I burked
you burked
he/she/it burked
we burked
you burked
they burked
Present Continuous
I am burking
you are burking
he/she/it is burking
we are burking
you are burking
they are burking
Present Perfect
I have burked
you have burked
he/she/it has burked
we have burked
you have burked
they have burked
Past Continuous
I was burking
you were burking
he/she/it was burking
we were burking
you were burking
they were burking
Past Perfect
I had burked
you had burked
he/she/it had burked
we had burked
you had burked
they had burked
Future
I will burke
you will burke
he/she/it will burke
we will burke
you will burke
they will burke
Future Perfect
I will have burked
you will have burked
he/she/it will have burked
we will have burked
you will have burked
they will have burked
Future Continuous
I will be burking
you will be burking
he/she/it will be burking
we will be burking
you will be burking
they will be burking
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been burking
you have been burking
he/she/it has been burking
we have been burking
you have been burking
they have been burking
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been burking
you will have been burking
he/she/it will have been burking
we will have been burking
you will have been burking
they will have been burking
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been burking
you had been burking
he/she/it had been burking
we had been burking
you had been burking
they had been burking
Conditional
I would burke
you would burke
he/she/it would burke
we would burke
you would burke
they would burke
Past Conditional
I would have burked
you would have burked
he/she/it would have burked
we would have burked
you would have burked
they would have burked
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.burke - British statesman famous for his oratoryBurke - British statesman famous for his oratory; pleaded the cause of the American colonists in British Parliament and defended the parliamentary system (1729-1797)
2.burke - United States frontierswoman and legendary figure of the Wild West noted for her marksmanship (1852-1903)Burke - United States frontierswoman and legendary figure of the Wild West noted for her marksmanship (1852-1903)
Verb1.burke - murder without leaving a trace on the body
murder, off, bump off, slay, polish off, dispatch, remove, hit - kill intentionally and with premeditation; "The mafia boss ordered his enemies murdered"
2.burke - get rid of, silence, or suppress; "burke an issue"
conquer, inhibit, stamp down, suppress, subdue, curb - to put down by force or authority; "suppress a nascent uprising"; "stamp down on littering"; "conquer one's desires"

burke

verb
1. To hold (something requiring an outlet) in check:
Informal: sit on (or upon).
2. To keep away from:
Idioms: fight shy of, give a wide berth to, have no truck with, keep clear of.
References in classic literature ?
"That's John Burke, the traveler," he condescended to explain.
Didn't you know Halkett wrote Burke's book for him?
There was Edmund Burke, one of the wisest men and greatest orators that ever the world produced.
Who, but Edmund Burke! True enough, but then whalemen themselves are poor devils; they have no good blood in their veins.
Dollop wished to know what was; but there was a prevalent feeling in her audience that her opinion was a bulwark, and that if it were overthrown there would be no limits to the cutting-up of bodies, as had been well seen in Burke and Hare with their pitch-plaisters-- such a hanging business as that was not wanted in Middlemarch!
The days of chivalry are not gone, notwithstanding Burke's grand dirge over them; they live still in that far-off worship paid by many a youth and man to the woman of whom he never dreams that he shall touch so much as her little finger or the hem of her robe.
His house stood near-by, on a balcony of rolling land that overlooked the town of Lyndon and far beyond, across evergreen forests to the massive bulk of Burke Mountain.
Harry Burke started his free money movement sincerely enough; now he's sponging on a half-starved sister for endless brandies and sodas.
The man who bore it skulked through the streets of Edinburgh in disguise, while the mob that applauded at the execution of Burke called loudly for the blood of his employer.
Parliamentary history has few better passages than the debate in which Burke and Fox separated in the House of Commons; when Fox urged on his old friend the claims of old friendship with such tenderness that the house was moved to tears.
So stand before every public and private work; before an oration of Burke, before a victory of Napoleon, before a martyrdom of Sir Thomas More, of Sidney, of Marmaduke Robinson; before a French Reign of Terror, and a Salem hanging of witches; before a fanatic Revival and the Animal Magnetism in Paris, or in Providence.
When the Countess of Fitz-Willis (her Ladyship is of the Kingstreet family, see Debrett and Burke) takes up a person, he or she is safe.