burlesque


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bur·lesque

 (bər-lĕsk′)
n.
1. A literary or dramatic work that makes fun of something, often by means of outlandish exaggeration.
2. A ludicrous or mocking imitation; a travesty: The antics of the defense attorneys turned the trial into a burlesque of justice.
3. A variety show characterized by broad ribald comedy, dancing, and striptease.
v. bur·lesqued, bur·lesqu·ing, bur·lesques
v.tr.
To imitate mockingly or humorously: "always bringing junk ... home, as if he were burlesquing his role as provider" (John Updike).
v.intr.
To use the methods or techniques of burlesque.

[From French, comical, from Italian burlesco, from burla, joke, probably from Spanish, from Vulgar Latin *burrula, diminutive of Late Latin burrae, nonsense, from burra, wool.]

bur·lesque′ adj.
bur·lesque′ly adv.
bur·lesqu′er n.

burlesque

(bɜːˈlɛsk)
n
1. (Art Terms) an artistic work, esp literary or dramatic, satirizing a subject by caricaturing it
2. a ludicrous imitation or caricature
3. (Theatre) a play of the 17th–19th centuries that parodied some contemporary dramatic fashion or event
4. (Theatre) theatre Also: burlesk US and Canadian a bawdy comedy show of the late 19th and early 20th centuries: the striptease eventually became one of its chief elements. Slang name: burleycue
adj
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) of, relating to, or characteristic of a burlesque
vb, -lesques, -lesquing or -lesqued
to represent or imitate (a person or thing) in a ludicrous way; caricature
[C17: from French, from Italian burlesco, from burla a jest, piece of nonsense]
burˈlesquely adv
burˈlesquer n

bur•lesque

(bərˈlɛsk)

n., adj., v. -lesqued, -lesquing. n.
1. a comic literary or dramatic piece that vulgarizes lofty material or elevates the ordinary.
2. any ludicrous parody or grotesque caricature.
3. a stage show featuring comic, usu. bawdy skits and striptease acts.
adj.
4. involving ludicrous or mocking treatment of a solemn subject.
5. of, pertaining to, or like stage-show burlesque.
v.t.
6. to make ridiculous by mocking representation.
v.i.
7. to use burlesque or caricature.
[1650–60; < French < Italian burlesco, derivative of burl(a) jest]
syn: burlesque, caricature, parody, travesty refer to literary or dramatic forms that imitate works or subjects to achieve a humorous or satiric purpose. The characteristic device of burlesque is mockery of serious or trivial subjects through association with their opposites: a burlesque of high and low life. caricature, usu. associated with visual arts or with visual effects in literary works, implies exaggeration of characteristic details: The caricature emphasized his large nose. parody achieves its humor through application of the style or technique of a well-known work or author to unaccustomed subjects: a parody of Hemingway. travesty takes a serious subject and uses a style or language that seems incongruous or absurd: a travesty of a senator making a speech.

burlesque

- From French, which got it from Italian burlesco, a derivative of burla, "joke, fun"—which may have come from Latin burra, "trifle."
See also related terms for trifle.

burlesque

an exaggerated representation; grotesque parody or satire.
See also: Representation

burlesque


Past participle: burlesqued
Gerund: burlesquing

Imperative
burlesque
burlesque
Present
I burlesque
you burlesque
he/she/it burlesques
we burlesque
you burlesque
they burlesque
Preterite
I burlesqued
you burlesqued
he/she/it burlesqued
we burlesqued
you burlesqued
they burlesqued
Present Continuous
I am burlesquing
you are burlesquing
he/she/it is burlesquing
we are burlesquing
you are burlesquing
they are burlesquing
Present Perfect
I have burlesqued
you have burlesqued
he/she/it has burlesqued
we have burlesqued
you have burlesqued
they have burlesqued
Past Continuous
I was burlesquing
you were burlesquing
he/she/it was burlesquing
we were burlesquing
you were burlesquing
they were burlesquing
Past Perfect
I had burlesqued
you had burlesqued
he/she/it had burlesqued
we had burlesqued
you had burlesqued
they had burlesqued
Future
I will burlesque
you will burlesque
he/she/it will burlesque
we will burlesque
you will burlesque
they will burlesque
Future Perfect
I will have burlesqued
you will have burlesqued
he/she/it will have burlesqued
we will have burlesqued
you will have burlesqued
they will have burlesqued
Future Continuous
I will be burlesquing
you will be burlesquing
he/she/it will be burlesquing
we will be burlesquing
you will be burlesquing
they will be burlesquing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been burlesquing
you have been burlesquing
he/she/it has been burlesquing
we have been burlesquing
you have been burlesquing
they have been burlesquing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been burlesquing
you will have been burlesquing
he/she/it will have been burlesquing
we will have been burlesquing
you will have been burlesquing
they will have been burlesquing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been burlesquing
you had been burlesquing
he/she/it had been burlesquing
we had been burlesquing
you had been burlesquing
they had been burlesquing
Conditional
I would burlesque
you would burlesque
he/she/it would burlesque
we would burlesque
you would burlesque
they would burlesque
Past Conditional
I would have burlesqued
you would have burlesqued
he/she/it would have burlesqued
we would have burlesqued
you would have burlesqued
they would have burlesqued

burlesque

A coarse form of dramatic parody that seeks to entertain through distortion or ridicule, for example in the comic treatment of serious and well-known works.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.burlesque - a theatrical entertainment of broad and earthy humorburlesque - a theatrical entertainment of broad and earthy humor; consists of comic skits and short turns (and sometimes striptease)
show - a social event involving a public performance or entertainment; "they wanted to see some of the shows on Broadway"
2.burlesque - a composition that imitates or misrepresents somebody's style, usually in a humorous wayburlesque - a composition that imitates or misrepresents somebody's style, usually in a humorous way
caricature, impersonation, imitation - a representation of a person that is exaggerated for comic effect
Verb1.burlesque - make a parody of; "The students spoofed the teachers"
mock - imitate with mockery and derision; "The children mocked their handicapped classmate"
travesty - make a travesty of
Adj.1.burlesque - relating to or characteristic of a burlesque; "burlesque theater"

burlesque

noun
1. parody, mockery, satire, caricature, send-up (Brit. informal), spoof (informal), travesty, takeoff (informal) The book read like a black comic burlesque.
adjective

burlesque

noun
A false, derisive, or impudent imitation of something:
verb
To copy (the manner or expression of another), especially in an exaggerated or mocking way:
Translations

burlesque

[bɜːˈlesk]
A. ADJburlesco
B. N
1. (= parody) → parodia f
2. (US) (Theat) → revista f de estriptise
C. VTparodiar
D. CPD burlesque show N (US) → revista f de estriptise

burlesque

[bɜːrˈlɛsk] n (= performance, writing) → parodie f

burlesque

n
(= parody)Parodie f; (Theat) → Burleske f; (Liter) → Persiflage f
(US Theat) → Varieté nt, → Varietee nt; (= show)Varietévorstellung f
adj
(= parodic)parodistisch; (Theat) → burlesk; (Liter) → persiflierend
(US Theat) → Varieté-; burlesque showVarietévorstellung f
vtparodieren; book, author, stylepersiflieren

burlesque

[bɜːˈlɛsk] nparodia
References in classic literature ?
The "Hymn to Hermes" differs from others in its burlesque, quasi- comic character, and it is also the best-known of the Hymns to English readers in consequence of Shelley's translation.
Then, if the boy has read a good many other books, he is taken with that abundance of literary turn and allusion in Thackeray; there is hardly a sentence but reminds him that he is in the society of a great literary swell, who has read everything, and can mock or burlesque life right and left from the literature always at his command.
These sorry figures are made to pass very unheroically through a series of burlesque adventures.
Sheer farce and coarse burlesque, with plenty of color for the money, still made up the sum of what the public of those days wanted.
But for the profanity of the woman's language, and the really lamentable credulity of the poor old lady, the whole thing would make a fit subject for a burlesque.
A conduct which must have shocked the credulity of a pious and sagacious heathen; and which could never have been defended, unless by agreeing with a supposition to which I have been sometimes almost inclined, that this most glorious poet, as he certainly was, had an intent to burlesque the superstitious faith of his own age and country.
In the same manner all the characters of the two bands advanced and retired, and each executed its figures, and delivered its verses, some of them graceful, some burlesque, but Don Quixote's memory (though he had an excellent one) only carried away those that have been just quoted.
Indulgent to defects both physical and mental, he listened patiently (by the help of the Princess Goritza) to the many dull people who related to him the petty miseries of provincial life,--an egg ill-boiled for breakfast, coffee with feathered cream, burlesque details about health, disturbed sleep, dreams, visits.
And then followed a burlesque narrative of how this gentleman had almost been married two days before.
Little Mildred answered nothing, but watched the North Star and hummed a selection from recent Simla burlesque that had much delighted the White Hussars.
As easily as there may be stupidity in a man of genius if you take him unawares on the wrong subject, or as many a man who has the best will to advance the social millennium might be ill-inspired in imagining its lighter pleasures; unable to go beyond Offenbach's music, or the brilliant punning in the last burlesque.
They had a merry little supper after they got home, and Polly gave them a burlesque opera that convulsed her hearers, for her spirits rose again and she was determined to get the last drop of fun before she went back to her humdrum life again.