burrow

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burrow
burrow of a woodchuck
A. entrance
B. spy hole
C. excrement chamber
D. nest

bur·row

 (bûr′ō, bŭr′ō)
n.
1. A hole or tunnel dug in the ground by a small animal, such as a rabbit or mole, for habitation or refuge.
2. A narrow or snug place.
v. bur·rowed, bur·row·ing, bur·rows
v.intr.
1.
a. To dig a hole or tunnel for habitation or refuge.
b. To live or hide in such a place.
2. To move or progress by or as if by digging or tunneling: "Suddenly the train is burrowing through the pinewoods" (William Styron).
v.tr.
1. To make by or as if by tunneling.
2. To dig a hole or tunnel in or through.
3. Archaic To hide in or as if in a burrow.

[Middle English borow.]

bur′row·er n.

burrow

(ˈbʌrəʊ)
n
1. (Zoology) a hole or tunnel dug in the ground by a rabbit, fox, or other small animal, for habitation or shelter
2. a small snug place affording shelter or retreat
vb
3. to dig (a burrow) in, through, or under (ground)
4. (often foll by: through) to move through by or as by digging: to burrow through the forest.
5. (intr) to hide or live in a burrow
6. (intr) to delve deeply: he burrowed into his pockets.
7. to hide (oneself)
[C13: probably a variant of borough]
ˈburrower n

bur•row

(ˈbɜr oʊ, ˈbʌr oʊ)
n.
1. a hole or tunnel in the ground made by an animal, as a rabbit, for habitation and refuge.
2. a place of retreat.
v.i.
3. to dig a burrow.
4. to lodge or hide in a burrow.
5. to proceed by or as if by digging.
v.t.
6. to dig a burrow into.
7. to hide in a burrow.
8. to make by or as if by digging.
[1325–75; Middle English borow, earlier burh]
bur′row•er, n.

Burrow

 a heap or mound; esp., an animal’s hiding- or dwelling-place, hence, the animals themselves collectively.
Examples: burrow of conies, 1669; of foxes, 1538; of puffins, 1832; of rubbish, 1875; of rabbits, 1540; of soil, 1784; of barking squirrels or prairie dogs, 1814.

burrow


Past participle: burrowed
Gerund: burrowing

Imperative
burrow
burrow
Present
I burrow
you burrow
he/she/it burrows
we burrow
you burrow
they burrow
Preterite
I burrowed
you burrowed
he/she/it burrowed
we burrowed
you burrowed
they burrowed
Present Continuous
I am burrowing
you are burrowing
he/she/it is burrowing
we are burrowing
you are burrowing
they are burrowing
Present Perfect
I have burrowed
you have burrowed
he/she/it has burrowed
we have burrowed
you have burrowed
they have burrowed
Past Continuous
I was burrowing
you were burrowing
he/she/it was burrowing
we were burrowing
you were burrowing
they were burrowing
Past Perfect
I had burrowed
you had burrowed
he/she/it had burrowed
we had burrowed
you had burrowed
they had burrowed
Future
I will burrow
you will burrow
he/she/it will burrow
we will burrow
you will burrow
they will burrow
Future Perfect
I will have burrowed
you will have burrowed
he/she/it will have burrowed
we will have burrowed
you will have burrowed
they will have burrowed
Future Continuous
I will be burrowing
you will be burrowing
he/she/it will be burrowing
we will be burrowing
you will be burrowing
they will be burrowing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been burrowing
you have been burrowing
he/she/it has been burrowing
we have been burrowing
you have been burrowing
they have been burrowing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been burrowing
you will have been burrowing
he/she/it will have been burrowing
we will have been burrowing
you will have been burrowing
they will have been burrowing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been burrowing
you had been burrowing
he/she/it had been burrowing
we had been burrowing
you had been burrowing
they had been burrowing
Conditional
I would burrow
you would burrow
he/she/it would burrow
we would burrow
you would burrow
they would burrow
Past Conditional
I would have burrowed
you would have burrowed
he/she/it would have burrowed
we would have burrowed
you would have burrowed
they would have burrowed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.burrow - a hole made by an animal, usually for shelterburrow - a hole made by an animal, usually for shelter
hollow, hole - a depression hollowed out of solid matter
rabbit warren, warren - a series of connected underground tunnels occupied by rabbits
Verb1.burrow - move through by or as by diggingburrow - move through by or as by digging; "burrow through the forest"
cut into, delve, dig, turn over - turn up, loosen, or remove earth; "Dig we must"; "turn over the soil for aeration"

burrow

noun
1. hole, shelter, tunnel, den, lair, retreat a rabbit's burrow
verb
1. dig, tunnel, excavate The larvae burrow into cracks in the floor.
2. delve, search, dig, probe, ferret, rummage, forage, fossick (Austral. & N.Z.) He burrowed into the pile of charts.

burrow

noun
A place used as an animal's dwelling:
Translations
جُحريَحْفُرُ جُحْرا، يَخْتَبِئ
díradoupěhrabat si doupěnorazahrabat se
grave sig nedhulekaninhule
ásföldbe ásott lyuk
grafa siggreni, hola, göng
olaraustisurvas
alapaslēptiesrakt aluslēpties alā
zahrabať sa
brlog

burrow

[ˈbʌrəʊ]
A. N [of animal] → madriguera f; [of rabbit] → conejera f
B. VT [+ hole] → cavar
to burrow one's wayabrirse camino cavando (into en)
C. VI [animal] → hacer una madriguera
to burrow intohacer madrigueras en, horadar (fig) → investigar minuciosamente
he burrowed under the bedclothesse metió debajo de la ropa de cama

burrow

[ˈbʌrəʊ]
nterrier m
vi
[animal] → creuser
[person looking for sth] to burrow into a pile → fouiller dans une pile
to burrow through sth → fouiller dans qch

burrow

n (of rabbit etc)Bau m
vi (rabbits, dogs etc)graben, buddeln (inf); (= make a burrow)einen Bau graben; they had burrowed under the fencesie hatten sich (dat)ein Loch or (below ground) → einen Gang unterm Zaun gegraben or gebuddelt (inf)
vt holegraben, buddeln (inf); to burrow one’s way into something (fig)sich in etw (acc)einschleichen

burrow

[ˈbʌrəʊ]
1. n (of rabbit) → tana, cunicolo
2. vt (hole) → scavare
to burrow one's way (under/through ) → scavarsi un tunnel (sotto/attraverso )
3. vi (rabbits) → scavare gallerie
he burrowed under the bedclothes → si è rintanato sotto le coperte

burrow

(ˈbarəu) , ((American) ˈbə:-) noun
a hole dug for shelter. a rabbit burrow.
verb
to make holes underground or in a similar place for shelter etc; The mole burrows underground; He burrowed under the bedclothes.

burrow

n (of scabies) surco (de la sarna); vi hacer un surco, hacer surcos
References in classic literature ?
I shall promote you from the fields to the burrows.
It was only too evident that these creatures possessed no gentle or chivalric sentiments to which she could appeal, and that she might escape from the labyrinthine mazes of their underground burrows appeared impossible.
It throws up at the mouth of its burrows hillocks of earth like those of the mole, but smaller.
But the people of Cold Lairs do not live in burrows.
Immediately from all about, out of burrows and rough, rocky lairs, poured a perfect torrent of beasts similar to my captors.
Now they ran to the spot and saw a little hole in the rock, scarcely bigger than an ant-bear's burrow, and through the hole came sounds and some light.
He sat in the spring sunshine outside the burrow, in a muffler; smoking a pipe of rabbit tobacco.
Old Johnson, in his "Wonder-Working Providence," speaking of the first settlers of this town, with whom he was contemporary, tells us that "they burrow themselves in the earth for their first shelter under some hillside, and, casting the soil aloft upon timber, they make a smoky fire against the earth, at the highest side.
Not indeed that I can hope to put into words the charm of those embowered cottages, like nests in the armpits of great trees, tucked snugly in the hollows of those narrow, winding, almost subterranean lanes which burrow their way beneath the warm-hearted Surrey woodlands.
I felt as a rabbit might feel returning to his burrow and suddenly confronted by the work of a dozen busy navvies digging the foundations of a house.
It stood there, bare and great and smokeless, like a place not lived in; only in one of the top windows, there was the peak of a nightcap bobbing up and down and back and forward, like the head of a rabbit from a burrow.
The burrow sloped into the ground at a gentle angle, so that we could see where the two corridors united, and the floor was dusty from use, like a little highway over which much travel went.