bushwalking


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bushwalking

(ˈbʊʃˌwɔːkɪŋ)
n
1. Austral an expedition on foot in the bush
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References in periodicals archive ?
The park provides visitors with excellent opportunities for bushwalking through magnificent gorge and escarpment scenery.
The McGowan Government will deliver the $10 million Collie Adventure Trails initiative to establish Collie as Western Australia's premier 'trail adventure town' to attract local, national and international mountain bike and bushwalking tourists, and support the local economy.
In addition to his passion for investigative journalism and historical writing, Peter's interests included bushwalking, cross-country skiing, sailing, reading and music (mainly Renaissance and Baroque).
In my early 20s, it was through bushwalking and working at Outward Bound that my love of and concern for nature deepened.
We often went bushwalking at weekends, he was one of the concelebrants (Archbishop Sir Guilford Young being the principal one) at our Nuptial Mass in Newman College Melbourne, and we remained good friends until he died at an advanced age.
Mountain biking, bushwalking, fishing or horse-riding in Budderoo National Park are all ideal ways to get closer to nature - or take a canoeing and camping trip along the Kangaroo River.
bushwalking club was heading--I knew nothing at all.
"There's so much you can enjoy as a family," says Sally, who suggests dog walking, treasure hunts, bike riding, indoor assault courses, camping, bushwalking, and involving children in little chores around the home, like gardening, washing the car and cleaning.
Her garb on the outback expedition evokes someone on safari rather than bushwalking. She is, though, suitably prepared for the terrain and does not seem overly intimidated by the surroundings.
A range of nature-based tourism and ecotourism activities were popular (bushwalking, camping, bird watching, astronomy, four-wheel driving), with 62% strongly agreeing with the statement 'I care a lot about conservation in the Flinders Ranges' and 54% claiming to spend time learning about ways to help protect the environment.
This is supported by the many comments elicited in the focus group interviews relating to students' fear for their own personal safety, particularly in relation to threats from Australian wildlife (snakes and insects featured extensively), getting lost in wilderness environments, and being exposed to environmental hazards such as heat-stroke, sunburn and personal discomfort from camping and bushwalking. It should be noted that these concerns were 'top of mind' when discussing nature-based tourism activities in focus group interviews but that they did not emerge as a key constraint to travel in general (discussed later in relation to Table 2).
"Bushwalking and Access: The Kosciusko Primitive Area Debate 1943-6," Australian Journal of Outdoor Education 13, no.