business end


Also found in: Idioms.

business end

n.
The part of a weapon or tool, usually at the front, that inflicts damage or performs work.

business end

n
informal the part of a tool or weapon that does the work, as contrasted with the handle

busi′ness end`


n.
the front part or end of a tool, weapon, etc., with which the work is done or from which a missile is ejected.
[1875–80]
References in classic literature ?
The business end of the funeral of the late Sir Dalliance the duke's son of Cornwall, killed in an encounter with the Giant of the Knotted Bludgeon last Tuesday on the borders of the Plain of Enchantment was in the hands of the ever affable and efficient Mumble, prince of un3ertakers, then whom there exists none by whom it were a more satisfying pleasure to have the last sad offices performed.
The gold may not be so soft as it appears, but it certainly looks as though you could bite off the business ends of the spoons, and stop your own teeth in doing so.
INSIDE 32PAGES FREEEVERY WEDNESDAY #theitboy Kicking up a stink at new Ron Burgundy movie Kicking up a stink at new Ron Burgundy movie At the business end of recycling PAGE 11 Forget the January blues .
This is the real business end now and where we are measured,' he said.
Rodolfo Celis answered a knock at his door one night and found himself staring at the business end of a gun.
The lowest level contains the active, business end of things--a garage, recreation area, study and ski waxing room, buttressed by a muscular retaining wall.
Instead of a cantilever, the business end of the new-style AFM is a conventional tip mounted at the center of a circular membrane roughly the size of the period at the end of this sentence.
ONE OF THE incidents that kicks off the spiraling narrative wheels of ``Stephen King's Kingdom Hospital,'' a limited series premiering tonight on ABC, is semi-autobiographical: Peter Rickman (Jack Coleman), a famous artist, meets the business end of an errantly driven van.
After a few years of growth, the tangled mass, called a "witches' broom," resembles the business end of an old-fashioned broom.

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