buskin


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bus·kin

 (bŭs′kĭn)
n.
1. A foot and leg covering reaching halfway to the knee, resembling a laced half boot.
2.
a. A thick-soled laced half boot worn by actors of Greek and Roman tragedies.
b. Tragedy, especially that which resembles a Greek tragedy.

[Perhaps alteration (influenced by buckskin) of obsolete French broisequin, small leather boot.]

buskin

(ˈbʌskɪn)
n
1. (Clothing & Fashion) (formerly) a sandal-like covering for the foot and leg, reaching the calf and usually laced
2. (Clothing & Fashion) Also called: cothurnus a thick-soled laced half boot resembling this, worn esp by actors of ancient Greece
3. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) the buskin chiefly literary tragic drama
[C16: perhaps from Spanish borzeguí; related to Old French bouzequin, Italian borzacchino, of obscure origin]

bus•kin

(ˈbʌs kɪn)

n.
1. a thick-soled, laced boot or half boot.
2. Also called cothurnus. the high, thick-soled shoe worn by ancient Greek and Roman tragedians.
3. tragic drama; tragedy. Compare sock 1 (def. 3).
[1495–1505; probably alter. of Middle French bro(u)sequin]
bus′kined, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.buskin - a boot reaching halfway up to the kneebuskin - a boot reaching halfway up to the knee
boot - footwear that covers the whole foot and lower leg
References in classic literature ?
But in that bitter tirade upon Chantilly, which appeared in yesterday's'Musée,' the satirist, making some disgraceful allusions to the cobbler s change of name upon assuming the buskin, quoted a Latin line about which we have often conversed.
Many were the compliments and expressions of politeness that passed between Don Quixote and Don Fernando; but they were brought to an end by a traveller who at this moment entered the inn, and who seemed from his attire to be a Christian lately come from the country of the Moors, for he was dressed in a short-skirted coat of blue cloth with half-sleeves and without a collar; his breeches were also of blue cloth, and his cap of the same colour, and he wore yellow buskins and had a Moorish cutlass slung from a baldric across his breast.
The yeomen expressed their wonted acquiescence in their leader's opinion; and Isaac, relieved of one half of his apprehensions, by learning that his daughter lived, and might possibly be ransomed, threw himself at the feet of the generous Outlaw, and, rubbing his beard against his buskins, sought to kiss the hem of his green cassock.
I had a short jacket of goat's skin, the skirts coming down to about the middle of the thighs, and a pair of open-kneed breeches of the same; the breeches were made of the skin of an old he-goat, whose hair hung down such a length on either side that, like pantaloons, it reached to the middle of my legs; stockings and shoes I had none, but had made me a pair of somethings, I scarce knew what to call them, like buskins, to flap over my legs, and lace on either side like spatterdashes, but of a most barbarous shape, as indeed were all the rest of my clothes.
He was charged following forensic tests on two pistols recovered from a car at Buskin Place in Carrickfergus on October 28 last year.
she had] a Familiarity of Elocution, unsuitable to the Dignity of Lady Macbeth; and though I would not have her tread the Stage in the Stilts of modern Tragedy, she should still remember that she wears the Buskin.
My grandfather would play his pipes, say in Glencoe and Willie would be in a different spot, not too far away, buskin for the tourists, always in full Highland dress.
Among specific topics are the textual transmission and manuscript history, the verbal and narrative art, myth and mythopoesis, philosophical ideas, the figure of Jason as a hero with a sandal and a buskin, Medea from epic to tragedy, Argonautic antagonists and Valerian villains, Virgilian prophecy and the reign of Jupiter, Flaccus and Seneca's tragedies, and Giovan Battist Pio's continuation of the Argonautica.
London, May 29 ( ANI ): The book 'Murder of Marilyn Monroe: Case Closed' by Jay Margolis and Richard Buskin has claimed that the actress did not committed suicide, in fact she was a murdered.
Old-timers argued for years about the origins of Beer & Skits, but it seems likely that the show grew out of social evenings once conducted in the Sock and Buskin Club, a meeting place for actors and newsmen across Rorie St.