butsudan


Also found in: Wikipedia.
Related to butsudan: Gohonzon

butsudan

(ˈbʊtsəˌdæn)
n, pl butsudan or -dans
1. (Buddhism) (in Buddhism) a small household altar
2. (Buddhism) (in Nichiren Buddhism) an ornate cabinet which holds the Gohonzon
[from Japanese butsu Buddha (from Chinese fu) + dan shelf]
References in periodicals archive ?
Es el lado mas japones que tengo el de ordenar, influenciado tambien por el Butsudan (altar japones) y estructurar el caos peruano que tengo (Tokeshi, entrevista personal, 2015).
The Japanese traditionally revere their ancestors, and a butsudan, a family Buddhist altar where incense is lit in prayer for departed loved ones, is still a common feature for Japanese homes.
He also follows a Japanese traditional ritual to commemorate dead family members: putting zenko incense and some Japanese okashi sweets in a butsudan altar in his brother's house after visiting the family cemetery.
But Miss Jennifer had on a previous visit picked up and brought the Cluster of Jewels Mandala and butsudan from Michael's apartment, and his altar was all appropriately center stage against the wall of his room.
For example, on special occasions, they purchased flowers and candles, which were placed near butsudan, a small wooden shrine, which commemorated ancestors in the church.
Alicia and Daigan Matsunaga see this as an important precedent for the Kokubunji system (1974, 23), though Ian Reader looks to this same entry as a precedent for butsudan [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] family altars (1991, 84).
Macbeth is set inside a huge Butsudan (a Buddhist altar still in use in many Japanese households) attended by two old women, figures from the actual world; the fictional chronotope begins with them actually opening the Butsudan doors.
The final chapter reports and interprets the findings from a questionnaire that reveal differing attitudes and practices, especially concerning the ancestral rites, on the part of Christian and non-Christian Japanese who have or do not have the butsudan (Buddhist altar for ancestral rites) in their homes.