butterbur

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but·ter·bur

 (bŭt′ər-bûr′)
n.
Any of several perennial herbs of the genus Petasites in the composite family, native to northern temperate regions and having large basal leaves and dense clusters of usually whitish or purplish flower heads.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

butterbur

(ˈbʌtəˌbɜː)
n
(Plants) a plant of the Eurasian genus Petasites with fragrant whitish or purple flowers, woolly stems, and leaves formerly used to wrap butter: family Asteraceae (composites)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.butterbur - small Eurasian herb having broad leaves and lilac-pink rayless flowers; found in moist areas
genus Petasites, Petasites - genus of rhizomatous herbs of north temperate regions: butterbur; sweet coltsfoot
herb, herbaceous plant - a plant lacking a permanent woody stem; many are flowering garden plants or potherbs; some having medicinal properties; some are pests
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

butterbur

n (bot) petasita
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
In Allan Water, near by where it falls into the Forth, we found a little sandy islet, overgrown with burdock, butterbur and the like low plants, that would just cover us if we lay flat.
It painstakingly demonstrates the melancholic associations of imagery as disparate as untied shirts, wide-brimmed hats, pollarded willows, musical instruments, cats, dogs, and butterburs, widening the scope of what might be recognised as depictions of melancholy in the late Renaissance.